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Thread: Tougher than we think?

  1. #1

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    Tougher than we think?

    Spring got off to a late start here in Northern California and when it finally did, we had @ 1 week of typical California spring weather - and everything popped from the Sarracenia species and hybrids - Dionaea and Drosera as well. Roses and citrus trees budding up and beginning to crack - aloes spiked up (they look like a starfish colony), Japanese maples fully leaved out and colored and nepenthes re potted and returned to the cold frame along with some orchids that stayed indoors for the winter.
    The local forecast yesterday AM said "A slight chance of a shower, nothing worth measuring". So around 5 pm the sky turns blackish grey, the kind funnel clouds like, (the county next to us had a tornado - small) and it began to rain...hard. The wind picked up, and the temperature dropped....hard - then @ 7, the sky cleared, so what was the worst that could happen?
    This morning we woke up to hard frost and 36 degrees, so after a while I went out to survey the "damage" and thankfully have found none! And we've got S. flava and all of it's species, both flowering (some have 7-10 buds and flowers) and pitchers 1' tall now with many coming up with them and no damage - I know sometimes frost damage can be slow to manifest itself, but I would think at this stage, damage would show up immediately, even if in burning small pitchers back -
    So tonight, it's supossed to get down to 37 and then pop back up to mid 40's at night, which is typical for here, and I can't cover them, as that would do more damage than the frost itself!

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    Gardening freak! tommyr's Avatar
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    Brief cold snaps don't seem to bother them much. So you're right! Tougher than we think!
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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    This morning we woke up to hard frost and 36 degrees"
    does not compute.."hard frost" and "36 degrees" are mutually exclusive!
    it was a hard frost if its 20 degrees at 7am.
    but of course the term "hard frost" is very subjective..probably what is considered a "hard frost" for your area is a very light frost for the plants..
    they can handle it just fine..never been a problem.

    and IMO a light frost doesnt even register on the "tougher than we think" scale..because its not really very tough, as far as the plants are concerned, its actually quite normal and common.

    Scot

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    Smile, it makes people nervous :) MH1's Avatar
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    We had a cold spell this winter with -20C on a few days, and two occasions when we didn't thaw out for about 2 weeks... I was taken by surprise (such cold weather is as rare as hen's teeth here), so everything got frozen solid in the mini-greenhouse, meaning I couldn't take anything out for fear that a sudden thaw would turn it to mush/cause botrytis. I only had the one Sarra (a flava) because I have only been growing since mid winter last year (I've bulked up a lot now ) but the S. flava took it, anyway. It's coming out of its dormancy now (albeit later than last year), and seems to be fine (although all the VFTs died). I would call that tough! Although, I doubt it matches up to NY winters!

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MH1 View Post
    Although, I doubt it matches up to NY winters!
    We cant leave VFT's or Sarrs outside at all in the winter
    you say you didnt thaw out for 2 weeks?
    we dont thaw out for 4 months..

    The northern USA and Canada is the origin of "the fridge method"..
    we have to do things that way, because the fridge is much WARMER than outside!

    Im surprised you lost VFT's in England! thats quite unusual..
    sorry to hear that..

    Scot

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    Tastes like chicken! Exo's Avatar
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    I have vfts and sarrs in my bog garden that got through the winter just fine....although I did have about a foot of dead leaves on top of them as mulch.
    Some days it just isn't worth chewing thru the restraints.

    My growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...255#post961255

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    Smile, it makes people nervous :) MH1's Avatar
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    ^_^ Even in the north of England it's about a zone 8 (thank god for the gulf stream!). Without it, we'd probably have winters as bad, or worse, than yours! Although, we don't really have a decent summer here because of the Gulf steam... but then again, that favours Darlingtonia . Heh, you picked on my English interest of the weather!

    I would have a bog garden too, but I think our dog would just end up peeing in it . It's not worth the effort!

    Losing the VFTs was partly due to the fact that I forgot to move the mini greenhouse from the front garden to the back . We get strong gusts down in the front garden, and the whole thing blew over just before the first cold snap :/ The flava didn't fall out of its pot, but everything else did. . I re-potted everything, but the VFTs weren't in very good shape after re-potting. They were only garden centre ones though. The most annoying thing was that all of my seedlings got chucked around, too. Managed to save some Sarracenia ones, but the VFT seedlings went AWOL.

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    SDCPs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottychaos View Post
    The northern USA and Canada is the origin of "the fridge method"..
    we have to do things that way, because the fridge is much WARMER than outside!

    Scot
    While this may be true, the fridge method is most useful to those growing in tropical climates. Most people in very temperate zones seem to put their temperate plants in their basements or breezeways. Why not?

    Anyway, how do you know your situation is the origin of the "fridge method?" Is there some documentaion as to who "invented" it?

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