User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 12 of 12

Thread: Springtime Ceph Pix.

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It sounds like you were growing them like some people grow terrestrial utrics.

  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The wick system is simple. Travis (Pyro) detailed this in his write up on his methods of growing some Utricularia. I believe it on Terraforums some where and it was printed in a past issue of The Carnivorous Plant Newsletter of the ICPS.

    Ed Read recommends this method for growing Cephalotus.

    Basically take a piece of absorbent material (yarn, thick string, long fiber sphagnum moss) and hang it out one or more of the drain holes of you pot. Suspend the pot or place it on top of something the tray below. Place the "wick" so that the free end reaches the bottom of the tray. Fill the tray so that the water level stays below the bottom of the pot and keeps the wick in water. Capillary action should draw the water to the pot unless there is too much distance to overcome gravity.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #11
    Stovepipe (The Beast) RIP My friend. JMatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    334
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here are some observations on root growth with my cephalotus plants.
    This is one example of how I grew cephalotus in a fish tank.

    I guess the best way to explain the set up would be to list everything from the bottom of the tank up to
    the plants. At the bottom of the 45 gal (high) fish tank there was 2 inches of water with a stone fish tank bubbler
    to keep it aerated. Above that was an air gap of 8 inches which had overturned pots. Above this was egg crate material that sat
    on the pots. I had a layer of fine window screening on the egg crate material. I then placed a 3/4 inch nylon rope across the egg crate material from one end of the tank to the other. On the ends I had the rope go threw the egg crating all the way to the bottom
    of the tank. This was for wicking the water up to the media. Then I added 8 inches of soil and my plants on top.
    I did cover the tank, and only used a two bulb T-12 shop light for lighting.
    The cephalotus plants I added grew very well for a couple years, hardly ever having to water them.
    The problem I found growing the plants this way was that the roots grew threw 8 inches of soil,
    threw the fine window screen and then hung down all the way to the water at the bottom of the tank.
    It was virtually impossible to remove a plant from the tank without damaging the fine roots.
    Using the rope to wick up water into the media was ok, but the soil was always just barely damp.
    The plants seemed to seek out the water source and grew roots 16+ inches long.
    If I hadn't grown them myself, I would have never believed that they could grow such long roots.
    The fact that I could only add plants to the tank and not remove them for fear of severe root
    damage, and the fact that the set up was just too big to move around I shut down the whole thing.

    I still grow cephs in tanks, just smaller, putting 8 inches of media right on the tank bottom.
    It's a much easier way to go and if the tank is covered they will only need watering once every couple months.
    I have plants that grow stolons just under the soil surface right across the tank.
    Some stolons being almost a foot long. You can remove the plants much easier, with less stress on the roots.
    Cephalotus plants can, and do grow very long tap roots, but I'm not so sure if it's necessary
    for good growth. I've had beautiful plants in a 3 inch pot, and single plants that were the size of a dinner plate.
    To me cephs can be a real pain in the rear, but you gotta love em!
    Just some thoughts.
    JMatt

  4. #12
    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Diego, USA
    Posts
    5,025
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    THANKS!!

    Very informative and awesome

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Sugar Land Springtime (pics)
    By SpyCspider in forum Greenhouses, Terrariums and Bog Gardens
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-06-2010, 02:10 AM
  2. Sugar Land Springtime (pics)
    By SpyCspider in forum Greenhouses, Terrariums and Bog Gardens
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-04-2010, 08:26 PM
  3. A little springtime prep
    By Nflytrap in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-10-2004, 09:20 AM
  4. It's springtime in september!
    By swords in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-06-2003, 05:54 AM
  5. Ceph
    By Phil traper2 in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-14-2003, 03:57 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •