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Thread: Darlingtonia Self-watering System + Temp Questions

  1. #17
    Natalie's Avatar
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    Thanks again, guys. Those videos are cool stuff... I've been thinking of trying to find some Darlingtonia in the wild at some point in the future, and those videos help me get an idea of the habitat. Rob, it looks like you have a drip system going in your garden? Pretty cool!

    Oh I've been wondering about one more thing... I keep reading that Darlingtonias are frequently found in areas with toxic serpentine soil. I happen to live very close to an area filled with serpentine rock - would it be beneficial to add a bit to my Darlingtonia's pot? Or do they just grow in those areas because little else does?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie View Post
    It seems like the the coastal varieties are really the only ones that need fussing over, and the mountain types are a bit hardier.
    The clone that I have is a coastal variety. I got it from Peter D'Amato, who told me that coastal varieties were hardier than mountainous ones. Although, like you, I seem to keep seeing over and over again that the mountainous varieties are hardier. If only I had one of each to set side by side
    Grow to learn, learn to grow.

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    Natalie's Avatar
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    Wow, that's kinda strange. Although, I guess the coastal form might be hardier if you're trying to grow it right along the coast in the Bay Area, with all the fog, low temperatures, and humidity all the time. Your area can get pretty hot in the summer though, so I guess it depends more on the individual plant and whether or not it came from good stock than the variety. I wanted to grow mine in full sun so it could get nice red pitchers, which is why I wanted to get the Sierra form.

  4. #20
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    As long as the root temperatures stay below 81F these plants will survive air temperatures in the triple digits. A nightly temperature drop helps too. Some of the "coastal" areas can get up to triple digit temperatures in summer. The mountain populations can tolerate larger daily temperature drops - high 90s/low 100s to low 60s/mid 50sF.

    Coastal populations can have plenty of red coloring too.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  5. #21
    Rob's Avatar
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    @natalie Yes I am trying to construct a circulating bog for my darlingtonia, sarracenia, drosera and dionaea!

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    Natalie, nice setup! I was gonna say make sure to cover that clear tubing to prevent algae growth but then read on You might want to use white electrical tape instead of the duct tape as it should be more durable in the long run (it's made from PVC rather than cloth).

    Let me know how that pump works out, we're always looking for an INEXPENSIVE solar pump setup that lasts a while (the one we carry retails for about $400! ). If you ever want some help with a prefilter come on down to where I work in Mill Valley (The Urban Farmer Store). Special discount for TF members!

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    Natalie's Avatar
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    Not a Number - Yep, that's the part I'm having trouble with, is keeping the roots cool. We are having some warmer days right now (afternoon temps in the 90s), and the reservoir just doesn't hold enough water to not heat up during the day. Yesterday was even hotter during the day (almost 100 here), and I was out of town so I couldn't monitor the root temperatures. I am positive they got above 81 degrees, but they also would have been flushed with water constantly. Today at around 11:00 am I noticed that the thermometer I have in the roots was reading 80 degrees, so I put five large ice cubes into the reservoir, but now less than an hour later, the root temperatures are back up to 80 (they had gotten down to the low 70s when the ice was melting). Unless I hire someone to put several ice cubes in every hour, I think I'm just going to have to allow the root temps climb and let the plant duke it out for itself... I think the constantly flowing water will help with that. The fact that one of those videos showed plants growing in 86 degree soil helped calm my nerves a bit, but I am still a tad worried.

    Rob - Awesome! Be sure to post some photos when the whole thing is up and running smoothly.

    Brian - Thanks for the tip! I'm probably going to have to do that when the duct tape starts deteriorating. My solar pump was definitely inexpensive, but it's also not very powerful (it's made for bird baths) and I'm not sure how reliable it is. When I went outside this morning, the sun was blazing but only a few drops were trickling from the fountain head. I opened up the pump to see if there was anything clogging it (there wasn't), put it back together and it still wasn't working. I felt around and found that one of the plastic pieces suddenly decided not to fit well anymore, which was letting water escape from the side of the filter and diminish its power. So then I took that off and put it in a different position, which seems to be wrong judging by the alignment of the holes but somehow fits better (sealing off the leak), and now it works again. Weird little thing.

  8. #24
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Make sure as much of the pot is shaded or not exposed to direct sunlight to help keep the temperatures down.

    Or

    You can try a zeer - an African pot-in-pot evaporative cooling refrigerator.

    Basically place your existing pot in a much larger porous unglazed ceramic/terracotta pot and fill the space between the pots with sand. Wet the sand and as the water evaporates it will cool the inner pot. As well it increases the thermal mass of the system taking longer for the inner pot to warm up.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pot-in-pot_refrigerator
    http://www.scidev.net/en/features/re...rican-way.html
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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