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Thread: My sarrs look like crap this year

  1. #9

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    I noticed that trend as well. Your sarrs look great though, RL.

  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Yep, very little spring and summer growth for me the last couple years. A couple of my S. minor are only now putting out their second pitcher of the year thanks to the recent warm weather.

    Blame it on La Niņa.

    What is La Niņa?
    La Niņa is defined as cooler than normal sea-surface temperatures in the central and eastern tropical Pacific ocean that impact global weather patterns. La Niņa conditions recur every few years and can persist for as long as two years.

    What are the global impacts of La Niņa?
    Both El Niņo and La Niņa impact global and U.S. climate patterns. In many locations, especially in the tropics, La Niņa (or cold episodes) produces the opposite climate variations from El Niņo. For instance, parts of Australia and Indonesia are prone to drought during El Niņo, but are typically wetter than normal during La Niņa.

    What are the U.S. impacts of La Niņa?
    La Niņa often features drier than normal conditions in the Southwest in late summer through the subsequent winter. Drier than normal conditions also typically occur in the Central Plains in the fall and in the Southeast in the winter. In contrast, the Pacific Northwest is more likely to be wetter than normal in the late fall and early winter with the presence of a well-established La Niņa. Additionally, on average La Niņa winters are warmer than normal in the Southeast and colder than normal in the Northwest.
    However if your pitchers are stunted and twisted looking check for thrips, mealybugs (check the roots too), aphids and/or spider mites.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #11
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Just to illustrate here are photos of my not quite a S. leucophylla 'Hurricane Creek White'. I say not quite because all though the mother plant it was divided from supposedly came from John Hummer himself it has never really produced the large wide mouthed pitchers that are characteristic of 'Hurricane Creek White'. In all other respects it would match.

    Spring pitchers


    Fall pitchers from just the past 2-3 weeks thanks to a few days of warm weather (above 75°F) we've had recently. The tallest pitcher is about 30 inches measured from the top of the potting medium.




    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  4. #12
    Lover of Mountains nightsky's Avatar
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    I'll have to see if they have pests. My leucos are just lanky and floppy. This time last year they were putting out some great, stout pitchers. In general all my sarrs stayed small, put out fewer pitchers and had less color than last year, almost like they are starving for light. But they are in the same spot as they were last year which has plenty of sun. Maybe it something to do with the weather, but this summer has been nearly identical to last in these parts, ie warm to hot and dry (though I keep them well watered).

    There is an exception. My flavas did fantastic this year. Maybe they used all the good fortune early on

  5. #13

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    Every once in a while mine look very sickly and they just can't seem to get going. For me, it's often from red wigglers and night crawlers that creep in to the pots during the winter dormancy and wreck the soil.

    I flush with a solution of dishwashing detergent and they come wriggling out of the pots. This doesn't hurt the plants. Then I repot into a clean fresh mix.

    Hope this helps someone.

  6. #14
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Same boat here... Central Texas scorching heat with severe drought conditions. It has been really hard on the plants.

  7. #15
    Natalie's Avatar
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    Interesting, I've been experiencing the opposite - all my CPs have been doing great this year (except my VFTs). Although it could just be because I'm new to carnivorous plants and just got my first ones in the summer of 2010, and I started out with smaller plants that were expected to grow more. For example, when I got my S. minor last year, it had 5-6 pitchers - this year it put out 26 new pitchers (and counting, it hasn't slowed down its growth), flowered, and looks like it's about to split the 4" pot it's in. My S. purpurea made two flowers this spring, and while it got a late start on pitcher growth and didn't put any new ones out till July, it now has more than it did last year when I got it. For all my other Sarracenia (I got a whole bunch this year), and my Darlingtonia, this will be their first winter with me, so I'll have to wait and see how they do next year.

    I think one reason why my plants have been doing well is because I have them up on a deck 20-25 feet above the ground. The deck heats up pretty fast as long as its sunny, even in winter, and that combined with the fact that they are in a black tray means that their roots are usually pretty warm like they would be in their native habitat. I think the fact that they are so high up also prevents a lot of pests that would infest ground-level plants (like worms, as Bill mentioned). That said, these past two summers have been unusually cool in California, so that probably contributed to the lack of growth seen by many members here. Strangely, elsewhere on the continent, they seem to have had an unusually warm summer this year...

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