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Thread: Cephalotus rhizome cutting in wood pulp

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    mobile's Avatar
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    Cephalotus rhizome cutting in wood pulp

    A number of weeks ago I brought my Cephalotus in from outside, the largest of which had a flower stalk which had finished flowering. Being rather lazy, I decided to just pull the stalk out, rather than cut it, which resulted in me pulling out a length of rhizome, a pitcher and some leaves with it. I didn't really care as to whether the rhizome rooted or not, as it's just a typical, so I decided to try another growing medium experiment. We have a pet hamster and we use a by-product of the paper making industry as a bedding for it, that being a high temperature dried wood pulp. This material is absorbent and fibrous, which sort of reminds me of fibrous peat, so I decided to pot the rhizome in that. Figuring that it would probably offer very little in the way of nutrient or anything else beneficial, I decided to make a 'starter' solution to water it with so mixed some molasses, a vitamin tablet, trichoderma and mycorrhizal powder into deionised water and gave the wood pulp a good watering with it after planting the rhizome. I top water the plant with deionised water most of the time but occasionally add some of the 'starter' solution. Within a week or so of planting new leaves were visible and within the next few weeks more have appears:



    As molasses are sugar, there is obviously a risk of unwanted fungal growth, though I'm hoping that the Trichoderma and mycorrhizal keep it at bay. There is also a chance that these they will digest the cellulose in the wood pulp, thus breaking it down. Time will tell, but as it's been growing well for a good number of weeks I decided to share the results.

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    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Ah, Nice Mobile!

    Another fine example for people here, to realize that the conditions we give our plants are what is most important, and that these fine plants are more adaptive & tolerant of things like "growing media" so long as other environmental conditions are met.

    Interesting type of bedding material.... I don't think I have seen anything like it here.
    Nice going...
    ...as always!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

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    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrowinOld View Post
    Interesting type of bedding material.... I don't think I have seen anything like it here.
    I think that you might have a similar product there called 'Carefresh Natural Pet Bedding', which is also available in the UK but not what I used. I don't know if the consistency is the same though.

    Quote Originally Posted by GrowinOld View Post
    Another fine example for people here, to realize that the conditions we give our plants are what is most important, and that these fine plants are more adaptive & tolerant of things like "growing media" so long as other environmental conditions are met.
    I've been growing Cephalotus for years and I have not found a 'best medium'. I've found some that they will grow in and a some they are not so keen on, but all-in-all the growth rate difference between suitable mediums is minimal. I've been down the path of complex mixes, such as 'Charles Brewer's mix', which I'm told is not exactly what he uses nowadays, and many others and to be honest I can't really say I noticed much or any difference to growing in plain peat/perlite. When you think about it, many of the ingredients are inert, so combining them pretty much serves to increase or decrease air and moisture ratios. If you get an 'ideal' air/moisture ratio for 'your conditions' then things such as adding nutrients, be them salts or organics, can then start having an influence.
    Last edited by mobile; 10-16-2011 at 02:13 AM.

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    cpsammich's Avatar
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    You never cease to amaze me

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    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    For science!

    That's awesome.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    Thanks for sharing your results!!
    Check out my Growlist

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    richjam1986's Avatar
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    I've always wanted to try this type of experiment... What was the molasses for?
    Da' mishu
    Provo, Utah.

    My Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...29#post1089429

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    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richjam1986 View Post
    I've always wanted to try this type of experiment... What was the molasses for?
    Blackstrap molasses promote microbial activity and it also contains nutrients that could be beneficial to plants, plus will (I think) help feed the Trichoderma and mycorrhizals.

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