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Thread: Sarracenia psittacina in the wild, various forms

  1. #9
    stretch.... yawn... jbradt's Avatar
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    Nice pics. Can't wait until mine gets a little more mature.
    Indeed. Most indeededly. Phillip J. Frye


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  2. #10
    Charlatan lizasaur's Avatar
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    Oooh, very nice!!
    Is the difference of the Ware Co psittacina the little...notch at the end of the beak? :3

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    Quote Originally Posted by i<3carnivores View Post
    Oooh, very nice!!
    Is the difference of the Ware Co psittacina the little...notch at the end of the beak? :3
    I think that's one of the differences. Many of the other clones have more rounded beaks. In addition, the parrot 'heads" on some clones-for example, the first picture of the dead plant-are really big relative to the entire leaf. There's also a varying degree of white speckles-check out the amount of white in the Bay Co, FL pic versus the Franklin Co, FL pic. Lastly, the other clear difference is color-some are really red, others are yellowish, and there are even non-AF green ones. This might be genetic as opposed to environmental because the really red and really green plants were growing in similar light levels/conditions.


    Wireman-That's a very interesting observation. In cultivation, if I submerged them too deep, they tend to rot. Interestingly enough, some of the biggest plants in the wild are found in semi-aquatic situations. Perhaps when the traps are under water, they're able to catch more prey-it almost seems like the traps are pretty ineffective when not in water.

    I opened up an older pitcher from one of the plants, and didn't find any insects in it. It would be interesting to see what the aquatic ones are catching-didn't get a chance to see any of those....

  4. #12
    Grow Pitcher Plants! DroseraBug's Avatar
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    Wow, fantastic photos and plants. Quite a shot from Ware Co. GA. I like the sand accumulation (Is that a fire ant mound?) and how it's stll on the pitchers there. Beautiful plants.
    "And this is what happened, and this is why the caribou and the wolf are one; for the caribou feeds the wolf, but it is the wolf that keeps the caribou strong."
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  5. #13
    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    Mine doubled in size after I partially submerged it (accidentally). It's a 10 year old plant, and it was maybe about 2.5 inches across when I took it home. It's now about 5 inches wide and very colorful. I've noticed their leaves dry very well, probably because of their low capture rate.

    Have you seen the psitts in Marion County and the snadhills of Georgia? They're massive!!! They also grow floating in water, or nearly doing so. Brad Wilson has taken some excellent photos of them.

  6. #14
    monkey_Cup's Avatar
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    wow great pictures, those plants have some awesome color, thanks for sharing

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    DroseraBug-not sure what sort of animal made the mound. The main insects I remeber were ticks (it was horrifying!) and mosquitos, which were also horrifying. it looked like I had chicken pox after the entire trip!

    Wireman-yeah, saw Brad Wilson's pics on Flickr-those were definitely amazing! It looks like some of those plants were submerged in water temporarily-maybe during the rainy season, and then as it dries up, they hang out on the banks. It would be nice to see them in the wild, but I think those locations are all kept a secret, and I respect that. However, since they are on private property, it would be nice if the land owners put seeds into circulation to back up those populations in cultivation in case anything happens.

    Monkeycup-pleasure to share them!
    -Mike

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