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Thread: Darlingtonia Tips?

  1. #9
    CPsam's Avatar
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    I grow my Darlingtonia in a bog garden and in a large 12" x 12" pot. The media is just peat moss, nothing else. They have been growing well for over 5 years now. Of course, I live in Oregon so our climate is more optimal for them.

    Not sure if soil matters all that much. Mine grow great in straight peat, other growers have them in sphagnum and i just visited a friend who had them growing in straight serpentine (the heavy metal containing rock that many populations are found growing in).

    Experiment and see what works well for you. My number one recommendation is: use a wide pot/container.

    Best of luck!

    Sam

  2. #10
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Have you got a sarracenia?

    Treat the darlingtonia in exactly the same way.

    Forget keeping the roots cool. Complete myth IMO.

  3. #11
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Wow Natalie!
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    Natalie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ57 View Post
    Thanx. Looks like a good setup and easy to do. I bet a pot they use for aquatic plants that have holes all the way around would work really well with allowing water to flow freely and with aeration. Your plants look very happy, look like the ones in my pond setup. I think the constant water flow makes a big difference. The one in my bog looks good, but not as robust in growth. I think a deeper reservoir would keep the water cooler, but hey, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. My pond is 250 gallons and 18" deep, so water does not get hot, but not cold either. Looking at your plants they are no different than mine, so maybe it does not matter the water temperature, just the constant flow and cool down at night.

    Do you change out the water in the reservoir regularly? If so, how often?
    I just changed the water for the first time yesterday, after a couple months or so of it running. However, the system sort of replenishes itself when the water evaporates and I add more distilled water or it rains. The main reason I changed it yesterday was because there were some dead bugs in it (ew) and algae growing in the tubes, which I tried to clean. The plant seemed to be growing fine in the old water, but I was worried about too many nutrients building up in it from the dead bugs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexis View Post
    Have you got a sarracenia?

    Treat the darlingtonia in exactly the same way.

    Forget keeping the roots cool. Complete myth IMO.
    Yes but keep in mind that since you're growing these plants in a cold climate to begin with, what works for you might not work for others. In fact, I think someone attempting to grow Darlingtonia in the same way as Sarracenia would be a disaster in the subtropical climates that prevail in much of the US. On the west coast we are a bit lucky in the sense that we generally have cool nights even the in the summer, however, in far southern California the heat still might be an issue. In Anaheim for example, where the OP is from, the average nighttime low in summer is almost as warm as your daytime high in the summer - 17C vs 20C. That combined with the 30C daytime temperatures in Anaheim (that's average too, it often gets much hotter) might mean trouble for Darlingtonia if it's sitting in a stagnant pool of warm, hypoxic water.

  5. #13
    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie View Post
    In fact, I think someone attempting to grow Darlingtonia in the same way as Sarracenia would be a disaster in the subtropical climates that prevail in much of the US.
    I don't think that it's a coincidence that all the respondents so far are from the left coast. I know many on the east coast have attempted to grow cobra's but successes are few ....
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    (with Pics)

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    I have my Darlingtonia outside on the benches with my Sarracenia. So far growing nicely in a tray. However media very different from that I use with the sarrs. Lava rock/pumice large chunks and live sphagnum. Testing terracotta pot and plastic side by side. not fair comparison in that pots are not the same size...... Need more testing but so far they are doing well. Although I am in the subtropics, conditions where I live are not unlike zone 9-10 ......

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    Natalie's Avatar
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    Do you have to do anything special for dormancy, kulamauiman? Looking at the climate for your area, it seems like you get daily highs in the 60s/70s and nightly lows in the 50s year-round - that seems like it would be perfect for Darlingtonia unless they require lower temperatures for dormancy. Although I think you've mentioned your Sarracenia stop putting out pitchers in the winter? I guess even though you're technically in the tropics, the combination of slightly shorter days and your highland climate might be enough to make the plants go dormant.

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    actually sub tropics. The sarracenia all have started going dormant already. New pitcher production slowing down and I suspect, in addition to temperature dropping , day length may be a partial trigger. Also, seeing good evidence to suggest that reducing water might help promote dormancy. I see leaf scales forming around the growing points. Will probably need to simulate a frost in the sarracenia by heavy pruning of the pitchers. This will be first winter for the darlingtonia. Need to watch them this year. It looks like they are already slowing down like the sarrs....

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