User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Decapitating my Cephalotus?

  1. #1
    Agent of Chaos Wolfn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,407
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Decapitating my Cephalotus?

    Greetings. My Cephalotus is starting to become a little over-grown. Newer leaves are crowding out others and the entire plant is a big mess with multiple grow points.

    The obvious solution would be to uproot the plant and separate it, however I don't want to disturb the soil.

    I was reading in a carnivorous plant book (the authors were from Peter Pauls Nurseries) and it talked about plant decapitation. Basically, the entire upper portion of the plant is clipped off at ground level, leaving the base of the stem on the surface and the roots ready to start growing again. The clipped portion can then be potted and will grow roots as a cutting.



    What do you think? Good idea?
    "I may be on the side of angels, but do not mistake me for one."

    Wolfn's Growlist

  2. #2
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    ARTificial Bog in da' Middle of da' USA
    Posts
    932
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are wanting to "thin" out the plant,
    indeed the cut pieces can be rooted if stem or root portions are included.
    Instead of cutting the entire top off, I think I would keep one or two of the best segments still attached.
    That way you won't be risking everything, and will be allowing the remaining growth points
    the room they need to grow.

    I would re-pot / divide, but then I am comfortable doing that & have had quite good succes.
    (I have been dividing/re-potting plants for a long, long time, and don't have reservations in doing it to nearly any plant. There are some that are more tender than others, and don't appreciate disturbance. However like most things, the key is in knowing how to handle the plant, and sometimes "when" is the safer/best time to do it.)

    The route you are choosing is a compromise to having to do that, and will still give you something to try rooting from. I have also "de-headed" certain plants (but not all by any means!), and while I usually don't do it, you shouldn't have any problems doing this with a ceph. from what I can see. (Do consider my comments about doing this, as they may help.)
    You may also want to slightly poke into the loose soil to see if you can bring along some roots when "decapitating" top portions.
    The plant may still encounter shock, however it should be less than it might get from dividing.
    (I wouldn't try to convince you to divide it if you don't think you can do so successfully.)

    Lastly, unless it really seems a mess, you could also just keep allowing it to grow more.
    Or, if you want it to be a really small plant instead, let me know & I will trade you a small one for it!

    Whatever you decide to do...
    Good luck.


    By the way, when you have access to something cheaper, try doing some transplanting and dividing. It wouldn't be a good idea to practice on a Ceph or other expensive plant, but the experience from doing it with cheaper plants will go a long way!
    Just a thought
    .
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  3. #3
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfn View Post

    I was reading in a carnivorous plant book (the authors were from Peter Pauls Nurseries) and it talked about plant decapitation. Basically, the entire upper portion of the plant is clipped off at ground level, leaving the base of the stem on the surface and the roots ready to start growing again. The clipped portion can then be potted and will grow roots as a cutting.
    Say what you will of the Pietropaolos and their "uneven" reputations on the various fora, their methods have always proved useful to me; and I have used the "decapitation" method on many occasions over the years and always with success. Their book, Carnivorous Plants of the World has been in constant print for the last twenty-six years for a good reason.

    I would, though, encourage the use of a rooting agent on the cut end, though I cannot recall whether it had been recommended . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  4. #4
    mass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    8,144
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I vote decapitation.
    I just did this with D. admirabilis since the roots were obscenely large. Was a success all around.
    Would be cool to see what happens with Cephalotus. I imagine a large top growth would root pretty easily. And most likely, there's already new growth just below the surface of the root section.

  5. #5
    Agent of Chaos Wolfn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,407
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mass View Post
    I vote decapitation.
    I just did this with D. admirabilis since the roots were obscenely large. Was a success all around.
    Would be cool to see what happens with Cephalotus. I imagine a large top growth would root pretty easily. And most likely, there's already new growth just below the surface of the root section.
    And once the upper portion takes root, I can sell it on ebay for a massive sum of money
    "I may be on the side of angels, but do not mistake me for one."

    Wolfn's Growlist

  6. #6
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfn View Post
    What do you think? Good idea?
    I understand what the others are saying and I suspect that you'll have at least some (if not full) success with decapitation. However, I'd still recommend that the 'optimal' approach is to carefully remove the rootball/media from the pot, analyze the situation and separate the plant into as many pieces as makes sense for you. When all the pieces have been repotted - just ensure that they get a somewhat higher humidity environment than normal for a few weeks until they're over their trauma (& water with a Tricho solution).

    Do some searches for threads where elgecko & av8tor1 show their repotting efforts. I believe that Av shows both Heli's & Cephs in a few threads - worth a read.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfn View Post
    ... however I don't want to disturb the soil.
    Personally, this strikes me as a borderline silly reason. Disturbing the soil is part of growing these plants - not something to be afraid of. (Unless, of course, it's one of the few CPs that abhor root disturbance -- a group in which Cephs are not included imho).
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •