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Thread: A year in the life of Cephalotus follicularis

  1. #9
    Nepenthes101's Avatar
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    Absolutely wonderful looking Ceph there. Love how well it has colored up for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mato77429 View Post
    Well, the two people who would be able to give you the most detailed advice on the subject are Butch and David. That being said, it's essentially just a type of fungus that is found in all soils in nature, and helps the plants by colonizing the roots, acting as an avirulent biocontrol agent. It helps defend the plant from various diseases and has even been shown to help with nutrient uptake. As far as plants like Cephalotus and Heliamphora are concerned, the chances of one of those "sudden death" stories happening, that you often hear about, can be greatly reduced by protecting the plant with Trichoderma (or so it seems).

    I just mix it with water and pour it into the media of all my plants (save some of the dews) once a month. I also soak any new plants or plants that I'm repotting in it for at least half an hour. I've come to see it as something of a necessity.
    Thanks for that info. I knew about Trichoderma, but just hadn't considered it an "essential" for my toolkit. I will look into it now. :-)

    I would have thought that once you have applied it to your soil, that "inoculation" had occurred and repeated applications wouldn't be necessary, especially as you state that it "colonizes the roots". Can anyone speak to that? Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nepenthes101 View Post
    Absolutely wonderful looking Ceph there. Love how well it has colored up for you.
    Thanks very much! I have to say, it has been a ridiculously easy plant to grow, but then in my climate, I have one of the "essential ingredients": cool nights, even through the summer. I am convinced this is important for long term health of the plant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    I would have thought that once you have applied it to your soil, that "inoculation" had occurred and repeated applications wouldn't be necessary, especially as you state that it "colonizes the roots".
    That sir.. is a GREAT question.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mass View Post
    That sir.. is a GREAT question.
    Lets hope someone pipes up with an answer :-) In the meantime, I did find this: "Many species of Trichoderma, if given optimal conditions, establish stable and long-lasting colonisations of root surfaces and even penetrate into the epidermis (outer layer of root tissue) and a few cells below this level. This intimate relationship between Trichoderma and the host root cells is what induces localized and systemic resistance responses to pathogen attack."

    FROM THIS URL: http://urbangardenmagazine.com/2011/...ponic-systems/

    That clearly suggests that, once inoculated, the organism should continue to live in the media indefinitely. Still, I hope someone "in the know" will add their perspective on it.

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    31drew31's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    Lets hope someone pipes up with an answer :-) In the meantime, I did find this: "Many species of Trichoderma, if given optimal conditions, establish stable and long-lasting colonisations of root surfaces and even penetrate into the epidermis (outer layer of root tissue) and a few cells below this level. This intimate relationship between Trichoderma and the host root cells is what induces localized and systemic resistance responses to pathogen attack."

    FROM THIS URL: http://urbangardenmagazine.com/2011/...ponic-systems/

    That clearly suggests that, once inoculated, the organism should continue to live in the media indefinitely. Still, I hope someone "in the know" will add their perspective on it.
    I would also like to hear some opinions about this.

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    Sorry, didn't see this question. Well, the reason I reapply it is because of my bimonthly fertilization. Apparently Trichoderma can become less effective with too many nutrients in the soil, so I just like to help boost the colony every now and then.

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