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Thread: Outgrown pot

  1. #9
    Noob purple_monkfi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post

    Incredible color for windowsill growth. How many years have you been growing it?
    I've had it about 6 or 7 years. My husband randomly brought it home one day lol. He thought i'd appreciate it more than flowers and he was right hahaha. It's a very nice plant tbh, it colours up beautifully without too much light which is surprising.

    I'm in the burbs
    but our weather is absolutely insane lately. It's stupidly hot one day, icy cold the next, then we get gales. It's mad! Also our garden gets next to no light so I don't think they'd be very happy there. I could give it a go though, if I split it I could always experiment with some of the divisions.
    Poor things heh.

    If I repotted it into a long pot about the same width as the sill would it grow lengthwise to fill or would it prefer a round pot?

    And thanks guys, i'm pretty proud of my plant but I can't really take any credit. I do next to nothing to it aside from fetch it rain water and trim dead bits every so often. It's just a very robust Sar, if it can survive my beginner bumblings it must be tough.

  2. #10
    Peatmoss's Avatar
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    I would say a long pot would work, it should grow sideways, and having a bank of sarra on you windowsill would look really nice.
    <Av8tor1> as big as peat is, the bear runs not him

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  3. #11
    MICKEY's Avatar
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    very nice ,put it in the long pot and divide it next early spring if you want , a 1 meter long flower window box would work great and keep doing want you are doing if it an't broke don't fix it

  4. #12

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    Agreed on all of the opinions above. Tearing a sarr apart is dicey in mid-season, but I move plants up to larger pots all the time by keeping the rootball intact and moving it into a larger pot. As mentioned, fill in the gaps with additional soil or sphagnum, being sure not to use normal potting soil or peat moss that has fertilizer in it. A long pot will work fine. Nice job. Looks like something from the "bug series" of plants.

  5. #13
    jlechtm's Avatar
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    I'm sure you'll get a lot of opinions. Here are mine :-):

    In my experience with S. purpurea and its hybrids (and yours appears to have purp in it, likely with minor (and perhaps back crossed with minor another generation (?)), the pitchers will become crowded as much due to the multiple growing points bumping into each other as the growing end of the rhizome pressing itself against its pot.

    If it were mine, I'd divide it to avoid that internal crowding (I think a row of round pots would look as nice as one long rectangular pot on that windowsell ... imho).

    As for when to divide and repot? I just came in from the backyard, where I've been repotting like mad. It's warm here (78 deg F with 36% humidity). We're not quite into a typical summer yet, but it's getting there.

    Part of my late repotting is necessity. I have more than 100 Sarracenia that are in desperate need of repotting, and it's going to take me many, many weekends to accomplish this task.

    Part of it is also experience. I have never (knocking on peatmoss) had problems dividing/repotting late into summer and even fall. I have potted up divisions from friends that I've received as late as November without issue.

    Now I keep my plants at right around 40 degrees F low in a greenhouse for the winter, so that might have something to do with this success. I also dust exposed live rhizome (i.e. the white tissue you see when you cut or break a Sarracenia rhizome) with sulfur powder to help prevent fungal attacks. Maybe that helps as well (shrug).

    Hope this helps!
    Growing CP since 1975. Succeeding (more or less) since 1990.

    Sarracenia & Heliamphora Growlist

  6. #14
    MICKEY's Avatar
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    wow jlechtm i just checked out your grow list ,drool drool,im just starting out with sarrs and have like 6 different ones , all i can say is wow im very jealous wow, we need photos, my keyboard is all covered with drool wow

  7. #15
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    If you've been growing it that long and it is still producing flowers each spring then it maybe be doing ok dormancy wise. People who grow Sarracenia in the tropics report after a few years without dormancy the plants will start putting out deformed pitchers and phyllodia. That could be what's going on here. It may also be from the media breaking down and releasing stored nutrients. Time will tell. Some people will tell you you can only grow Sarracenia outdoors or at least under full sun. In this case, as the saying goes, the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

    It's difficult to predict how the plants will grow. In general new growth points radiate out from on end of the rhizome as it were but seldom symmetrically if that makes any sense. If you examine the growth patterns of the crowns of the plants you'll hopefully understand what I'm failing to say.

    Yes, you can pretty much repot and divide Sarracenia any time. How much their growth gets put back depends on many factors - what phase of growth/time of the year, age of the plant, species, how savage you are in handling the plant, health of the plant and so forth. I prefer at the end of winter, others during the dead of winter and others at any time.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #16
    Noob purple_monkfi's Avatar
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    I'm reluctant to stress the poor thing more than necessary atm, so I might have to invest in a nice long pot in the interim. Give it a few months to fill that pot (oh, it'll fill a new pot. It took it about a week to fill this pot last time I repotted it, and the current pot is about 3X the size of the last one!)
    From what I can see looking at it, there's at least three distinct "growth points" where the pitchers cluster, with blank gaps between (there's a bald patch right in the centre)

    The pitchers come up fine but gravitate of course, toward the window where the light is. I rotate the plant when this becomes an issue to encourage growth on the other side. Unfortunately now with the crowding, what's happening is the pitchers as they develop are pinching against other pitchers or the edge of the pot, which then distorts them. You can see, when you examine them, the crushed section which is flattened. I do cut back the dead pitchers every so often to make space but it isn't enough.

    It doesn't go dormant but it does slow down, not sure if that's just the breed itself or that i'm not being cruel enough to it temperature wise. It used to live in a bathroom that was freezing in the winter and dark as anything, now it's in the bedroom due to moving house and access to light. It's warmer in this house because it's a 1960s build rather than an 1880s lol. So we're yet to really see how it handles winter. Our garden is pretty dark and London tends to be a lot milder than Yorkshire where we did live, so I may have to see what spending winter outside does to it. My only concern is finding a spot sheltered enough, given we keep losing fence panels to the wind, I get the impression this garden isn't very sheltered from gusts. Not sure it'd appreciate being constantly blown over. I don't think it would like it out there in summer. Our garden gets very little sunlight thanks to the shadow of the house itself. In the front garden I suspect some brat kid would steal it because brat kids steal anything that isn't nailed down outside the house. That and the neighbour's cat likes to dig up all out plants in the front garden and sleep on them. He sees new soil and he just has to poop in it. Stupid cat.

    I have potting media ready to go (Pearlite, peat, sphagnum mix) but I always like to make sure i'm doing the best thing before interfering with the plant.

    So would you say the best course would be to put it in a longer pot of similar width to encourage lengthwise growth, then come winter/spring time split it?

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