User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 19

Thread: Suitable Terra for a Heli?

  1. #9
    Av8tor1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,811
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How will it drain... what about corrosion?

    First impression is it might look pretty for a while, but become problematic over the long term.
    If the joints are soldered, you may also have issues with lead and tin leaching into the substrate.

    To keep helis long term you must keep them cool, bright, and humid... with an emphasis on cool.
    The vast majority of those who have tried Heliamphora in unventilated terrariums have been unsuccessful.
    Stagnation or heat eventually kills the plant.

    just my 2 cents, ymmv

  2. #10
    The Most Uncreative Name in the History of Ever Plant Planter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    675
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sundrew View Post
    ...keep the plant around 50-65F.
    Quote Originally Posted by utricularia View Post
    ...50-65F is probably the ideal. If you can hit that they probably love you...
    Yeah. The tepuis where Heliamphora live in the wild are high up, often shrouded in clouds. Definitely keep them cooler than other carnivorous plants.

  3. #11
    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Diego, USA
    Posts
    5,025
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Av8tor1 View Post
    How will it drain... what about corrosion?

    First impression is it might look pretty for a while, but become problematic over the long term.
    If the joints are soldered, you may also have issues with lead and tin leaching into the substrate.

    To keep helis long term you must keep them cool, bright, and humid... with an emphasis on cool.
    The vast majority of those who have tried Heliamphora in unventilated terrariums have been unsuccessful.
    Stagnation or heat eventually kills the plant.

    just my 2 cents, ymmv
    Just to chime in here and throw a wrench in the gears....

    I kept mine sitting in water and pretty roasting most of the time (I wouldn't be surprised if the terrarium actually reached 90*F a lot). But, make sure you have a pretty arid environment so that you get evaporative cooling (like a swamp cooler) work for you if that's the route you choose. BRIGHT lights, potted in lfs : perlite with a generous top layer of live sphag, super dry air, lots of air circulation, and watch them like a hawk! I did have a fatality every now and then, but minor wasn't one of them.

  4. #12
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cascadia Subduction Zone
    Posts
    2,113
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of the largest Heliamphora I've seen were being grown in fish tanks with a little bit of water on the bottom and a T8 fixture. Media isn't a big issue, but I have found recently that peat-based mixes work better for me (and many of the European growers will attest to this). I don't think there's much to say about cultivation other than "cool, humid, and bright." Granted, achieving all three conditions simultaneously takes some effort.

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    192
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mato View Post
    Some of the largest Heliamphora I've seen were being grown in fish tanks with a little bit of water on the bottom and a T8 fixture. Media isn't a big issue, but I have found recently that peat-based mixes work better for me (and many of the European growers will attest to this). I don't think there's much to say about cultivation other than "cool, humid, and bright." Granted, achieving all three conditions simultaneously takes some effort.
    I have worked with 50/50 peat/perlite sitting in a little water (about 6 or so inch high pots, water 0.5-1 inch up the pot), 50/50 LFS/Pumice and currently have my Heliamphora sarracenioides in (I think) equal parts peat, pumice, perlite- thought it might be 2 parts peat, 1 part pumice, 1 part perlite. I will take a look when I get home and try to guestimate. That guy is newer so we will see how it goes.

    H. folliculata is in the LFS mix- really seems to like it. H. neblinae is in the 50/50 peat/perlite- also seems happy. Both in a little water doing the wick thing. I tried using the top water approach for a while with all my helis but actually had more problems with it (mostly due to forgetting to water them...)

    I did have an H. tequila in the 50/50 peat/perlite (I think) but it died last summer during a heat wave. It appeared to have succumbed to a fungus. Not sure which problem was the main cause- maybe a little of each.
    Last edited by utricularia; 05-14-2013 at 02:51 AM.

  6. #14
    Aionios's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    72
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I really appreciate all these responses and find them very helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Av8tor1 View Post
    How will it drain... what about corrosion?

    First impression is it might look pretty for a while, but become problematic over the long term.
    If the joints are soldered, you may also have issues with lead and tin leaching into the substrate.

    To keep helis long term you must keep them cool, bright, and humid... with an emphasis on cool.
    The vast majority of those who have tried Heliamphora in unventilated terrariums have been unsuccessful.
    Stagnation or heat eventually kills the plant.

    just my 2 cents, ymmv
    My attempt would have been to plant a heli minor in the recommended substrate with a pebble tray underneath and put the pot in the lantern (second pic). There are openings at the top of the lantern for ventilation which I thought would be enough.

    But from everyone's advice, maybe this wasn't such a good plan.

    The idea came from the set ups I saw here (Full post) where someone was growing theirs in an undrained in a candle holder. Even that person warned that not all helis would be able to survive those conditions.

    Ah well. Helis for the future instead.
    "You cannot find peace by avoiding life."
    Grow List (04.26.2015)
    Artsy Things I Do

  7. #15
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mato View Post
    Media isn't a big issue, but I have found recently that peat-based mixes work better for me ...
    I split my 1st Heli (a minor) into 3 pieces & placed each piece in a different media. The piece in the peat mix hated life (yes I realize that one test isn't super significant but overall my Heli's have done well in mixes without that particular constituent).
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  8. #16
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Cascadia Subduction Zone
    Posts
    2,113
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    I split my 1st Heli (a minor) into 3 pieces & placed each piece in a different media. The piece in the peat mix hated life (yes I realize that one test isn't super significant but overall my Heli's have done well in mixes without that particular constituent).
    What proportion of aggregate were you using? Seems to work well if the media can still drain easily. Orchid bark/peat or perlite/peat at 3:1 is the sort of mix I'm referring to.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •