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Thread: Cephalotus consolidated

  1. #57
    Never Knows Best gill_za's Avatar
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    Dear Ceph experts, I might have messed up while dividing and re-potting my 4yr old Cephalotus. Currently the plant is not producing any pitchers, and the existing ones are sitting sadly with drooping lids and are slowly shriveling up (at least one already did).

    The starter plant was transplanted into a new pot after the daughter plants were removed (about a month ago). The pot is filled with (bottom to top):
    1. 3/4" of hydrotone pebbles so that roots are not sitting in the water (it should whisk water up into the soil though)
    2. Porous grass shield material to prevent soil washout, it does get wet and does let water through.
    3. 1/2" layer of turface - no idea why, old pot had it too.
    4. About 5” of soil.

    The rhizome/stem was poking about 1/2" above soil level. Sand was added on top to cover the surface and most of the rhizome/stem. It now sits in about - ” of water, in high humidity and constant gentle airflow. All of the lids are still drooping even when I add water to the pitchers. It is top watered often as well. The soil mix is very draining and has peat, turface, sand, small orchid bark and horticultural charcoal.
    Is it stress from re-potting or not enough moisture? Am I freaking out too early? I am concerned that too much of rhizome was above the soil level.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gill_za View Post
    This is probably a silly question, but knowing Ceph's sensitivity to disturbances of the surrounding soil, how do you guys take the divisions off of the mother plant so that it is not very stressed? There is no avoiding unearthing the plant, right? Or do you strictly take pullings?
    I rarely divide Cephs, I get enough leaves for all my needs + all the giveaways I can do and still end up with dead/decaying leaves year after year. Right now I easily have a hundred leaves and no time to ship/plant/care for them. I really wish we had a CP society around here but nothing.

    Quote Originally Posted by gill_za View Post
    Dear Ceph experts, I might have messed up while dividing and re-potting my 4yr old Cephalotus. Currently the plant is not producing any pitchers, and the existing ones are sitting sadly with drooping lids and are slowly shriveling up (at least one already did).

    The starter plant was transplanted into a new pot after the daughter plants were removed (about a month ago). The pot is filled with (bottom to top):
    1. 3/4" of hydrotone pebbles so that roots are not sitting in the water (it should whisk water up into the soil though)
    2. Porous grass shield material to prevent soil washout, it does get wet and does let water through.
    3. 1/2" layer of turface - no idea why, old pot had it too.
    4. About 5 of soil.

    The rhizome/stem was poking about 1/2" above soil level. Sand was added on top to cover the surface and most of the rhizome/stem. It now sits in about - of water, in high humidity and constant gentle airflow. All of the lids are still drooping even when I add water to the pitchers. It is top watered often as well. The soil mix is very draining and has peat, turface, sand, small orchid bark and horticultural charcoal.
    Is it stress from re-potting or not enough moisture? Am I freaking out too early? I am concerned that too much of rhizome was above the soil level.
    A photo would help alot. I would remove some of the straight sand from directly around the poking out part and add in something to help retain moisture. Maybe 1/3rd peat 2/3 sand. The combo of the dryer than normal rhizome + distubance of roots is likely the cause. Just need to nurse it back to health.

    Some live sphagnum about 1" right around the base of the plant can do wonders for helping a stressed plant. This is what I would do if I really wanted to save a plant.

  3. #59
    Decumbent Fanatic Jcal's Avatar
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    define very well draining. I have over done this before in the past and had a plant that limped along. I had a small amount of peat in the mix and it produced a very weak plant.

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    I'm working on taking a terrarium down and found something really odd. The soil has fallen over the years to create this cavern area in the back corner of the tank but there is NO light getting back there, none at all.

    DSC_0359 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

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    Since I got my cephalotus in a large, upside down "U" like growing habit, I potted it up in a little mound around the rhizome thingy, like finding an anthill with a hole and sticking a ceph into it, I think I like this way so the water(I think) will drain down faster to reduce crown rot. I by no means consider myself a ceph expert but I've grwon that ceph to about 5" across so
    "I really wish we had a CP society around here but nothing."
    yes, you're right! We need a CP society here in the Dallas area!
    Last edited by HeliamWalnut; 04-27-2016 at 02:17 PM.

  6. #62
    Greetings from the netherworld. curtisconners's Avatar
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    The profile pic that you see above is my actual photo. I am a hyper-intelligent snake that has learned to use the internet and I will eventually rule you all.

    Just kidding..... Or am I?

  7. #63

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    Well, was 5 inches across. Now its like 3.5 after all these divisions. All the cephs are rooted cuttings from the big one. Not at his best. Wish he could go back to his glory days. gotta wait till summer
    I was tempted to divide it even more but my Mom is like "Too many plants" so yeah
    image.jpg1_zpspghaafc0.jpg Photo by walnut4640 | Photobucket
    Last edited by HeliamWalnut; 04-27-2016 at 06:49 PM.

  8. #64
    Never Knows Best gill_za's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    A photo would help alot. I would remove some of the straight sand from directly around the poking out part and add in something to help retain moisture. Maybe 1/3rd peat 2/3 sand. The combo of the dryer than normal rhizome + distubance of roots is likely the cause. Just need to nurse it back to health.

    Some live sphagnum about 1" right around the base of the plant can do wonders for helping a stressed plant. This is what I would do if I really wanted to save a plant.
    Unfortunately, I do not have any living sphagnum (starting from scratch ). But below are the pics. I removed some of the sand pile to expose the stem/rhizome. BTW pitchers have liquid in them. I also add water if it runs out now.









    Before I first re-potted it, plant showed signs of a localized crown rot due to being in an enclosed "Death Cube" type container and overran with moss. Dropped some trichoderma solution on the crown in hopes of fighting off/preventing any re-infection.

    I began to think about re-potting it into a bigger pot (since the one it is in currently seems not tall enough) once the plant recovers and stabilizes for some time.
    Do you still suggest removing the sand and replacing it with soil with perhaps wet LFS around the stem/rhizome. Soil should stay uncovered (no sand layer) for the time being until it recovers?



    Quote Originally Posted by Jcal View Post
    define very well draining. I have over done this before in the past and had a plant that limped along. I had a small amount of peat in the mix and it produced a very weak plant.
    So I ran an experiment and poured about 100mL of water onto the media so that it does not ran off from the sides, but at the same so that most of it in the pot as fast as possible. It took 15 seconds for the water to reach the bottom and start draining. It continued to drain at a decreasing flow rate for another minute or two.
    Last edited by gill_za; 04-28-2016 at 06:48 AM.

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