User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Trichoderma and Sarracenia

  1. #1
    GreenBeast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Trichoderma and Sarracenia

    This growing season was going good for me until I started to lose several mature divisions to rhizome rot. The previous years I've lost a few divisions due to media getting too compacted over time. This year I decided to go with an airy mix with a higher perlite to peat ratio. I use the fertilizer-free stuff and I thoroughly rinse the media. I usually repot every other year as well, with pots smaller than 6 inches getting repotted every year. I've switched over to the tray method. I've been using low TDS tapwater (40-50 ppm) for a while now. The sarracenia get at least 8 hours of direct sunlight. However, the weather this summer has been up and down. Here in NYC we would get days where it barely breaks 75 then we get a week where it constantly rains followed by a week or two of 90+ degree weather. For the past 2 weeks, it's been unseasonably cool with the temps never getting above 80. We're supposed to get up to 90 degrees later this week.

    Anyways, back to the problem at hand. With the affected plants, the pitchers would start browning, followed by pitchers collapsing at the base near the rhizome. When I dug up the rhizomes, they would be soft and brown. I've tried cutting away at the affected rhizomes and soaking any non-rotted rhizome tissue with sulfur, followed by repotting with fresh media in a bleach-sterilized pot. Those divisions never made it. Another mature division (S. "Copper Vase") started showing signs of rhizome rot so I treated it with Cleary's 3336 after cutting away at the infected flesh and giving it fresh media. It seems that this might work but I'll probably have to check the rhizome to see if it's not rotting. Luckily I was able to save a small division but I'm keeping a close eye on it.

    I've been doing some research on the usage of trichoderma through the search function on the forum and Crystal's site to mitigate the infection of sarracenia and I have some questions.


    1. Does it work for sarracenia in preventing rhizome rot?
    2. Are there certain species or strains I should use?
    3. Should I go with the flowable or the granular stuff?
    4. What's the application rate for each type (granular vs flowable)?
    5. How often do I need to reapply?
    6. Is it's growth affected by any of the commonly available fungicides used for sarracenia? (in case I have to spray for Winter dormancy)


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Av8tor1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,811
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenBeast View Post
    This growing season was going good for me until I started to lose several mature divisions to rhizome rot. The previous years I've lost a few divisions due to media getting too compacted over time. This year I decided to go with an airy mix with a higher perlite to peat ratio. I use the fertilizer-free stuff and I thoroughly rinse the media. I usually repot every other year as well, with pots smaller than 6 inches getting repotted every year. I've switched over to the tray method. I've been using low TDS tapwater (40-50 ppm) for a while now. The sarracenia get at least 8 hours of direct sunlight. However, the weather this summer has been up and down. Here in NYC we would get days where it barely breaks 75 then we get a week where it constantly rains followed by a week or two of 90+ degree weather. For the past 2 weeks, it's been unseasonably cool with the temps never getting above 80. We're supposed to get up to 90 degrees later this week.

    Anyways, back to the problem at hand. With the affected plants, the pitchers would start browning, followed by pitchers collapsing at the base near the rhizome. When I dug up the rhizomes, they would be soft and brown. I've tried cutting away at the affected rhizomes and soaking any non-rotted rhizome tissue with sulfur, followed by repotting with fresh media in a bleach-sterilized pot. Those divisions never made it. Another mature division (S. "Copper Vase") started showing signs of rhizome rot so I treated it with Cleary's 3336 after cutting away at the infected flesh and giving it fresh media. It seems that this might work but I'll probably have to check the rhizome to see if it's not rotting. Luckily I was able to save a small division but I'm keeping a close eye on it.

    I've been doing some research on the usage of trichoderma through the search function on the forum and Crystal's site to mitigate the infection of sarracenia and I have some questions.


    1. Does it work for sarracenia in preventing rhizome rot?
    2. Are there certain species or strains I should use?
    3. Should I go with the flowable or the granular stuff?
    4. What's the application rate for each type (granular vs flowable)?
    5. How often do I need to reapply?
    6. Is it's growth affected by any of the commonly available fungicides used for sarracenia? (in case I have to spray for Winter dormancy)


    Thanks.
    Older posting of pyro's (who is a research scientist dealing with biopathogens)

    I would recommend PM'ing Chrissy, she has more experience with the regular use of trich and sarrs than anyone I know

    Personally, I would recommend Ampac Biotech's strain over the T22 strain commonly found in some products. I like using the flowable at 1 tsp per gallon once a month. I know some growers who apply it every two weeks.

    The granular I like using in the root zone during transplanting, I don't recommend it as a substrate additive.

    Trich is also less aggressive when in a nitrogen rich environment, so don't trich and fert at the same time.

    Pokie22, Ron, BigBella, etc are also routine users

    Trichoderma is slower growing than some pathogens, so its important to keep a healthy culture present... best to use as a routine therapeutic.

    It is a fungus and some fungicides will kill it as well, some wont... I recommend you contact the manufacturer for that information.

    It is not a cure all, but since using it I have had no loses from Heli sudden death syndrome

    HTH's
    Av
    Last edited by Av8tor1; 08-19-2013 at 05:51 PM.

  3. #3
    GreenBeast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for all the advice. How do I order from Ampac Biotech?

  4. #4
    Av8tor1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,811
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Call ampacbiotech.com and speak with Kelly, she grows a few Cp's and is also a member here.
    She will understand what you are wanting to do and be able to answer any questions you have.

    HTH's
    Av

  5. #5
    true424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    37
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi GreenBeast
    You can call me at (559) 266-8324, e-mail me at either kelly@ampacbiotech.net or kelmcwalk@yahoo.com (probably faster)
    We do work with certain fungicides, but with the new MOA's some are not compatible. I personally know our Trich works with Sarr's but again it will depend on the severity of the problem, conditions and problem. Give me a call or e-mail me and I would be more than happy to help all I can.

    Kelly

  6. #6
    GreenBeast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Av and I'll be contacting you soon Kelly.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •