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Thread: Do Darlingtonia need cool roots?

  1. #17
    fredg's Avatar
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    Thank you Ron.

    There are several myths commonly spouted, three come to mind instantly
    1. Darlingtonia need cool roots.
    2. If allowed to flower and seed, Dionaea die.
    3. Cephalotus cannot stand in water, they get root rot.

    This is not the thread for 2 and 3 however.

    Several growers are now proposing that a pathogen is responsible for the demise of Darlingtonia. Jeff Dallas of Sarracenia Northwest has proposed that a fungus infection such as Phytopthora is responsible.he has taken plants showing a 'typical' root rot and by " dipping them in Tebuconazole fungicide (Bayer Disease Control)" all have survived. Others propose a bacterial cause of the plants demise. There's a trial someone in one of your Darlingtonia unfriendly areas could try.

    My "Othello" was given to me about three years ago by a grower who could grow the plant to almost maturity and then it would collapse in the summer heat. This occured with him several times, the plant only surviving due to the small plants on the stolons ( luckily "Othello" is very prolific with stolons).
    My own plant is thriving and has formed a nice colony. The original grower has now adopted my method and his plant is performing much better. I supposed it's possible that the antiseptic qualities of sphagnum is having an effect here. Again it needs more people to try growing in trays of live sphagnum.

    Comments?
    Last edited by fredg; 09-10-2013 at 08:39 AM. Reason: added a missing r
    Fred

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    I applaud Fred for diligently collecting temperature data over the course of the summer. This type of information certainly helps to get us closer to understanding the needs & limits of Darlingtonia.

    I've had many permutations of this discussion with people. What I've found quite consistent with these discussions is that the people who assert that cobras do not need cool temperatures - come from places where cool temperatures are the norm - especially cool nighttime temps. Just once, I'd love to see the originator of a thread like this come from a non-mountainous, mid-atlantic state (or any of the gulf-coast states). Even outside these horribly Darlingtonia-unfriendly areas, success with cobras is rare in most of the southern & eastern USA. Frankly, I'm a bit surprised at this. If it is not the temperatures - are there any other potentially-viable theories why no one has success here? I suspect that there would have been at least a handful of reasonably competent growers within the legions of those who've tried & failed ....
    More or less sums things up for me. Night temps drop down to 50-60F range spring -fall. High 30s in winter. I really doubt same system I am using would work down at a lower elevation where temp range day and night are 90- mid 70s

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    fredg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kulamauiman View Post
    More or less sums things up for me. Night temps drop down to 50-60F range spring -fall. High 30s in winter. I really doubt same system I am using would work down at a lower elevation where temp range day and night are 90- mid 70s
    The question is, why do you doubt it would work at the higher temperatures? Could it possibly be because you've been told for years that it can't?

    I was informed last week that Dr Leo Song published years ago that the maximum temperature for Darlingtonia roots is 81-83F.
    On this summer's data this is clearly not correct.
    Fred

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    Don't think temp is the only factor. More so I think it has more to do with what humidity is doing at those higher temps. In my situation the warmer costal areas have very constant high humidity. Warm temps high humidity become good environment for the fungal pathogens. At home when it get warm in the day humidity drops.

  5. #21
    zesty. BioZest's Avatar
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    My cobra lilies were thriving in Sarracenia-ese conditions...until it accidentally got sprayed with bleach...

    RIP. my darling(tonia)

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    Gigantea's Avatar
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    Yeah there seems to be a huge difference between the sun here and elsewhere; I agree with the humidity assessment, that is absolutely true. The only plants I leave out in the sun all day here are palm trees and cacti/succulents. The CPs just won't take the afternoon sun. I only expose my CPs to morning/evening light and lately some of my VFTs have been showing signs of still getting too hot. Growing Darlingtonia? Well, not saying it's impossible, but I would sure like someone else to try it before I do because I have doubts. :P

  7. #23
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fredg View Post
    Several growers are now proposing that a pathogen is responsible for the demise of Darlingtonia. Jeff Dallas of Sarracenia Nothwest has proposed that a fungus infection such as Phytopthora is responsible.he has taken plants showing a 'typical' root rot and by " dipping them in Tebuconazole fungicide (Bayer Disease Control)" all have survived. Others propose a bacterial cause of the plants demise. There's a trial someone in one of your Darlingtonia unfriendly areas could try.
    The logic in this is solid. I, too, agree that the live sphagnum is imperative, Fred. I find myself concurring with the pathogen perspective.

    I would totally try my cobras with the pot-in-tray method if my current "over-engineered" setup was not working so well. When they out grow their pots they will hopefuly have produced a few stolons for me to experiment with. I will give the straight flooded tray a shot then.
    Corey Bennett

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    Formerly cbennett4041

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    living oklahoma, this really gives me hope to try darlingtonia, i can grow sarrs, VFT, several types of dews year around outside, and my biggest concern has always been the hot summer temps. Now i just need to get my hands on a cobra lilly to give this sphagnum/tray method a try. Thanks for the info everyone.

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