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Thread: Carnivorous Plants that do not need a terrarium?

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    Carnivorous Plants that do not need a terrarium?

    Hi,
    Are there any pitcher plants or carnivorous plants that do not need a terrarium to grow?
    I would like to be able to grow something medium-large in size on a West-facing window sill. It is a large windowsill.
    or do they all need very high humidity that can only be given in a greenhouse or terrarium?

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    This is my take on window sill carnivores:

    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/how...SillGarden.php

    I am curious what others have been able to grow well on a window sill so I can update the page.

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    Nepenthes newbie
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    I haven't grown any of these yet, but I do know (from sites as well as people that have told me) that most pings and some sundews (adelae and capensis) are fine with household humidity..

    Some easier Nepenthes (vents, and other hardware store varieties) can be acclimated to lower humidity, although some may be stubborn with pitchering.

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    thanks for the info! its awesome to see Nepenthes species grow on windows!

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    roxorboxor's Avatar
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    I grew all my Nepenthes on my window where humidity was as low as 30%. You can check out my windowsill link in my signature to see what they looked like.

    Honestly lots of plants will be fine without a terrarium. I have a heliamphora growing on my desk at work with no problem!

    I guess I should add that it depends where you live and what sort of conditions the plants will be getting.

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    Cephalotus actually growers better with lower humidity. It'll like the seasonal changes in light, too.

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    I can try a cephalotus too? though i think Nepenthes would be bigger and nicer on the big windowsill. can Nepenthes tolerate low temps? the windowsill can get cooler in winter.

    and how can i supply it with humidity? just keep the soil always moist, add sphagnum moss, or do i have to set it in a dish of water with pebbles?
    Last edited by Newman; 10-25-2013 at 08:08 AM.

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    I grow and have grown a number of plants on my east and west facing window sills. Because of the building next door the east facing window gets less direct sunlight than the west one. The other building is white so I get quite a bit of reflected light in the afternoon. The drawback with the west facing window is the heat can get brutal in afternoon and I have cooked a few plants. Now I keep the pots shaded so the pots are not exposed to direct sunlight or move the more root temperature plants outdoors for the summer.

    I have grown Cephalotus follicularis, Drosera hamiltonii, D. slackii, D. glabripes and D. regia for a number of years on the east facing window sill. I now grow them year round outdoors as the winter temperatures indoors were not low enough to encourage flowering. I regret moving my Cephalotus outdoors as it had gotten infested with mealybugs and is a mere shadow of what it used to be. The D. regia are much happier outdoors and were beginning to show signs of stress after 3 years indoors. Now they are thriving. I suspect cooler winter temperatures are needed for their long term growth. The same applies to D. glabripes.

    I also grow many South African Drosera on either windowsill as well as outdoors. Among them D. capensis, D. venusta, D. aliciae, D. admirabilis, D. madagascarensis and D. trinervia. There is little difference in how D. capensis, D. venusta, D. admirabilis and D. madagascarensis grow on the windowsill versus outdoors as long as you kept them fed. My outdoors area is a west facing covered balcony so the number of direct sunlight hours is about the same as the west windowsill. D. trinervia and D. aliciae will get much more color and smaller rosettes outdoors compared to east facing window.

    I also grow several different pygmy Drosera on my west facing windowsill. These absolutely thrive and for the most part do better than when grown outdoors. During hot spells in the summer these may begin to go dormant but I found that moving them from the windowsill to a table a few feet away will get them to switch back to active growth even though some species that like higher light levels might get a touch etiolated. Pygmy dormancy is still touch and go with me although I've gotten the attrition rate to below 30%. 10% would be my target goal.

    I live about a mile away from the ocean. Relative humidity is usually 50-70%. The geniuses that built this place put the heating elements in the ceiling so I don't have to worry about dry updrafts in the winter. There is no one below me. I rarely turn the heat on in the winter.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 10-25-2013 at 08:54 AM.
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