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Thread: Cedar, Cypress Mulch for Darlingtonia?

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    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    Cedar, Cypress Mulch for Darlingtonia?

    I am thinking about using cedar or cypress mulch as an ingredient in my Darlingtonia mix. Thoughts?

    Rob uses it... http://thepitcherplantproject.com/bl...-mixing-it-up/
    Corey Bennett

    My cultivated vegetation, carnivorous and otherwise...

    Formerly cbennett4041

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    I have been a long time user of cypress bark mulch (Heliamphora).... great stuff!
    Caveat, not sure the harvesting is environmentally sustainable

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    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    I now remember some of your old post discussing that now, Butch. Assuming either product would perform similarly, what is the longevity of mulch in general as a potting ingredient?

    I picked up a bag of cedar mulch at Lowe's earlier, by the way. Convince me of the benefits of cypress and I will exchange it.

    Also, what preparation do you perform on the mulch before using it?

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    Cypress depends on if you get bark or wood mulch, the bark contains more Cypressene (IIRC)
    The bark is harder to find and more expensive when you do find it

    to be honest, of all the pots I've repotted after using it, I have yet to find one where it had deteriorated.

    I grab a handful from bag and use it, no prepping

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    I cant comment on cedar, never used it...

    hillbilly logic always dictated to me that since cypress grows in swamps, it has to very resistant to rot, mildew and insects

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    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    The logic with cypress pans out. Much obliged, Sir Butch!

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    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
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    So out in the wild, they grow wedged into rock crevices in trickling mountain streams, or standing in swamps of chilly flowing water, so it seems like as long as you supply chilly water, they ought to do well. Mine are even growing in pretty compactly-growing top-layer of live sphag with what I assume is compacted lfs : perlite underneath.

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