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Thread: Sickly Darlingtonia ?

  1. #9
    Prince Ruffus Magnium tuballkain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bio View Post
    Is it the mountain or coastal form?
    I am assuming coastal cause it's a 'californica' ? At least that's what was on the tag @ the nursery.

    Ok, now I know the pitcher is supposed to be like that. I learn at least 1 lesson every time I'm here!
    Last edited by tuballkain; 04-24-2014 at 07:03 PM.
    Says to wife "Nah babe, I'm not trying to grow a pitcher plant big enough to put you in"

  2. #10
    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
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    Darlingtonia is a monotypic genus. This means that there is only one species: D. californica, however there are plants from coastal Oregon, and there are populations in the mountains of California. The reason that I asked was because the two varieties have different requirements. The coastal variety needs constant cool and humid conditions. The mountain variety can take warmer temperatures and a wider humidity range, however it needs a nighttime temperature drop to at least 65*f. Both varieties require dormancy, and their roots should be kept as cool as possible.
    Last edited by Bio; 04-24-2014 at 07:48 PM.

  3. #11
    Prince Ruffus Magnium tuballkain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bio View Post
    Darlingtonia is a monotypic genus. This means that there is only one species: D. californica, however there are plants from coastal Oregon, and there are populations in the mountains of California. The reason that I asked was because the two varieties have different requirements. The coastal variety needs constant cool and humid conditions. The mountain variety can take warmer temperatures and a wider humidity range, however it needs a nighttime temperature drop to at least 65*f. Both varieties require dormancy, and their roots should be kept as cool as possible.
    I really wish I knew now. I'm going to be more on que from now on when purchasing so I know what I'm getting. I think I'll go back and ask for some clarification. The only reason I put in pond is while I was doing some googling on CPs I saw this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQNhGeJeZmo

    Thanks for the info Bio
    Says to wife "Nah babe, I'm not trying to grow a pitcher plant big enough to put you in"

  4. #12
    The sticky ones are my favorite. Tacks's Avatar
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    How long have you had the plant? If it's a fairly recent acquisition you should know that Darlingtonia are considered a fairly advanced-difficulty genus, and plenty of accomplished growers have had problems with them in cultivation. Most of the successful growers have done a lot of studying and/or live in favorable climates. I haven't even attempted it yet, hahah. Good luck!

  5. #13
    Prince Ruffus Magnium tuballkain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tacks View Post
    How long have you had the plant? If it's a fairly recent acquisition you should know that Darlingtonia are considered a fairly advanced-difficulty genus, and plenty of accomplished growers have had problems with them in cultivation. Most of the successful growers have done a lot of studying and/or live in favorable climates. I haven't even attempted it yet, hahah. Good luck!
    Yea, it's new, I'm new to CPS myself

    The price was good, and the ones online looked so cool.

    I now have to control myself and do forward thinking, when purchasing
    Says to wife "Nah babe, I'm not trying to grow a pitcher plant big enough to put you in"

  6. #14
    The sticky ones are my favorite. Tacks's Avatar
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    Hahahah don't feel too bad! There are clones of Darlingtonia that respond really well to tissue culture, so they're cheap to produce and sell, even though they're hard to keep long term. If you want something with somewhat similar needs, but which is much easier, look at getting some Sarracenia. They are easy enough for beginners, and interesting enough that some people grow hundreds of clones and breed them for decades. Good luck!

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    The difficult thing about them is that they need to have their roots cool, as they grow in places where water is constantly flowing over them. You could try putting ice cubes on the soil to try to replicate that, and I would recommend doing that on hot days.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    If it's the mountain form, you don't need to worry as much about the soil temperature, as the soil in situ can spike to well over 85 F. The necessary part, mind you, is the aeration of the soil. A very open mix, and/or constant water flow is best. My seedlings are grown in a tall pot that has lots of live sphagnum, and holes all around the side, so there's always air flow through the roots and rarely any water issues.
    Darlingtonia is a lot easier than many people paint it to be, given the right conditions, but it should still be considered a more advanced-technique species. Certainly practicing with the mountain forms of Sarracenia species is a good start before you try cobra lilies.
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