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Thread: S. minor vs. Okee Giant and anthocyanin free...

  1. #9
    Chicxulub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shortbus View Post
    That is so cool that you can just slog out there any time you need your S. minor fix lol! Thanks for sharing! Keep your eyes peeled for sundews and Butterworts.
    I have tons upon tons of P. caerulea. In the front yard that is cut but not sodded, they absolutely thrive with how I don't allow the grasses to get over about 8" tall. We used to have several species of sundew, and I strongly suspect that they're still there, but they're tiny little red things that are extremely hard to find.

    I used to have S. flava and S. psittacina as well, but I've not seen them in over a decade. They were near the back of the property that can no longer be accessed due to extremely heavy growth.

    I'm currently involved with FDACS to attempt to use Florida's longleaf pine ecosystem incentive program to clear and re-plant the acreage. This land was originally longleaf pine savanna, then it was cleared and used to grow several generations of loblolly, then it was used as a pig farm for a few years (which flopped before it ruined the soil) and then it was sold as rural properties. The ecosystem is still here, but it is severely distressed. I'm going to do my best to restore it!
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  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq5532.html

    Don Schnell has given a prescription for how to differentiate the two varieties, which should only be used on flowering sized plants growing in full sun. The height of the plant, divided by the "diameter," is about 8 for S. minor var. minor, but it is 15 for S. minor var. okefenokeensis. I set the word "diameter" in quotes because the measurement you are taking is a little strange. First, look at the pitcher in profile. Notice the rim of the pitcher mouth is tilted downward, as in this photograph. Orient your ruler at the same slant as the pitcher rim, and measure the length from the front of the pitcher mouth, where the mouth joins the ala, to the back of the pitcher hood. Got it? If not, refer to the original publication by Schnell (2002b).
    20 miles would be in the ballpark - certainly for hybridization and wildlife to transport seeds.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 06-19-2014 at 04:59 PM.
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  3. #11
    Plant Whisperer Bio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chicxulub View Post
    I have tons upon tons of P. caerulea. In the front yard that is cut but not sodded, they absolutely thrive with how I don't allow the grasses to get over about 8" tall.

  4. #12
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    I doubt the plants are antho free, though as mentioned by others they may look like it. At the very base of the pitchers, where they meet the rhizome, normal plants with little color will show red in the pitcher attachments and the tips of new leaves growing out. Antho-free ones will tend to look almost fluorescent or even nearly translucent at the base.
    As for being Okee plants, 20 miles could well be within range for transported seeds, but certainly you'll need to see growth once they're getting full sun, and compare it with normal minors. Even young okee plants will have pitchers half the width relative to height compared to normal plants.
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  5. #13
    Steve Booth's Avatar
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    They are certainly too tall to be typical minors but as N a N says could be historic population or transported seed.

    If you look down on the rhizome there is normally some red colour at the base of the leaf close to the rhizome visible even in plants that have grown green because of shade, If you cant see any red pigment, remove the adjacent grass and let the sun in you will know in a week or so whether it is anthocyanin free or not.

    Cheers
    Steve

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