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Thread: Brown ring around S. minor pitchers

  1. #9
    PsychoSarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChronoKiento View Post
    It's weird that it's only happening to the S. minor and not the leuco or flava, they've all been eating like pigs since it got warm. The pitchers are nearly full! Still, it's nice to know that it won't kill the plant. S. minor is one of my favorites, and I want it to be large and robust.
    Some species will have that sort of shock worse than others
    Come to me flies and crawling bugs. This plant wants to give you great big hugs
    Aren't I pretty, don't I smell good? I'd come to you if I could
    But I can't so you must come to me, I'm sure we will get along splendidly

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    I'm getting the same thing on multiple species right now. It's usually a result of heavy feeding by the plants. Perhaps also dry-ish conditions... I have wondered perhaps if watering into the pitchers may dilute the nutrients enough that they no longer burn the pitchers.

    I am theorizing that the damage may girdle the leaf at least partially, cut it off from the roots, and thereby cause the rest of the leaf to dry out and burn. Perhaps the wing of Sarracenia acts sort of as a backup to keep at least some of the leaf alive, as it appears to be doing in your plant.

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    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    When I initially saw the brown part on the second pitcher, I put some distilled water into the pitcher to drown whatever insect was eating the pitcher (I thought that's what was going on). It's too early to tell if it has slowed the browning.
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    theplantman's Avatar
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    The only things I have seen eat Sarr pitchers are caterpillars (irregular holes, very obvious, little poops everywhere) and wasps (eat one single hole straight through the pitcher, bout the size of a hole punch.) The wasps only do this to escape.

    I also seem to get this more when my pitchers are full of ants. Maybe ants become toxic in large quantities? What are your pitchers full of?

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    Iwest's Avatar
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    I get this issue too. When a pitcher of mine catches too many ants or paper wasps, both of which are more acidic than other insects, the base of the pitcher will turn red and then eventually brown, I think sort of as an acid burn. Maybe check to see what it's been eating. Different species of sarrs will attract different insects, which may explain why your minor is the only plant of yours experiencing this problem.

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    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwest View Post
    I get this issue too. When a pitcher of mine catches too many ants or paper wasps, both of which are more acidic than other insects, the base of the pitcher will turn red and then eventually brown, I think sort of as an acid burn. Maybe check to see what it's been eating. Different species of sarrs will attract different insects, which may explain why your minor is the only plant of yours experiencing this problem.
    Maybe I will cut open the dead one to see what is primarily in there. I imagine there are a lot of fungus gnats and mosquitoes, but maybe there will be a surprise.
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  7. #15
    The Most Uncreative Name in the History of Ever Plant Planter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theplantman View Post
    I also seem to get this more when my pitchers are full of ants. Maybe ants become toxic in large quantities? What are your pitchers full of?
    Easy explanation for this phenomenon: As Iwest said, ants are more acidic than other bugs. You also are bound to get a lot more ants and wasps than other bugs since they will definitely go for the sweet nectar produced by the pitchers. Definitely check on what your plant is eating. This happened to my Sarracenia leucophylla "Tarnok" quite often (before it died).

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