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Thread: What's everyone using for Cephalotus substrate?

  1. #9
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Equal parts of perlite, coarse silica sand and peat moss.

    Of interest from "Field Notes on Cephalotus Follicularis in Western Australia" by Larry DeBuhr Carnivorous Plant Newsletter Vol 5, No.1:
    Cephalotus grows in bogs that have dense, compact peat soil. This soil is formed by the accumulation of partially decomposed vegetation material. The soils in southwestern Australia are commonly leached; that is, when it rains, minerals are carried out of the upper layers of soil and accumulate in lower levels. The amount of leaching increases with increased rainfall, and soil acidity increases with leaching. When the average yearly rainfall reaches or exceeds 60 inches, the soil becomes heavily leached and peaty in nature.
    Cephalotus bogs occur in low, depressed area or along stream beds, and are often completely inundated with water during the winter and rainy season. The soil is extremely absorbent and acts as a gigantic reservoir. The bogs never completely dry out, although they may not have standing water all of the year. The soil is very acidic, and decomposition of vegetative material is slow.
    Contrast to "Cephalotus Hunting in the Deep S.W. of Australia" by Allen Lowrie, Carnivorous Plant Newsletter Vol. 7, No. 4.

    Cephalotus grows only in the lower coastal areas of the South West of Western Australia, from East Albany to Augusta. The area extends inland in relation with the sand plain and is mos usually associated with this soil type. I have yet to find this plant growing in loam or clay soils. The swamp flats abound to the coast, broken only by sand dunes and rocky hills at the ocean. In this area water flows and seeps from the Karri forests through rivers, creaks and swaps finishing at inlets to the ocean.
    Cephalotus grows mainly in sloping ground where water seeps over layers of mixed sedimentary deposits consisting of black peat from a few moss species and leaf mould and sand) on laterite zones. This is typical of the coastal plain.
    He goes on to describe Cephalotus growing on the water seeps along cliff faces along the coast. Lowrie also describes Cephalotus growing on the top of a swampy area "the ground in the swamp is mainly knee-deep peat and mud complete with seeping water". And "along the the top of the swamp next to the golf course, Cephalotus is everywhere growing in full sun...Right in the mush black peat we found the rare D. hamilonii growing in three's and four's and clumped together".
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  2. #10
    Monkey's Avatar
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    A few years back, I've even heard of Cephalotus being grown in Miracle Gro Potting Soil. Straight up. I want to say it was either Mobile or Av8tor1 growing like this....but don't quote me on it.
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  3. #11
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for the awesome input. I now have one of the most well-rounded and substantiated perspectives on Cephalotus substrate in the world.

    Perhaps if any of you have any pics of your plants that could give a good idea to not only what soil mix you are using but how well it is working?

    I will be sure to document what soil mix I use and then hopefully I will update the thread in a few months just to show how progress is with the new mix.
    Last edited by Dexenthes; 12-28-2014 at 12:16 AM.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    Over the years I've been moving towards more inorganic mixes. Currently I'm about 1/3 peat to 2/3 turface and that seems to work really well for my conditions. I should add that I've also moved up in pot sizes and with smaller pots this mix may not work very well.

    Here is my newest oddity that is working well for me, these are seed starting sponges you can get at most online seed sellers. The main issue is that I can not seem to locate a larger sponge than 1.5" and for long term growth that just is not enough. However, for packing/shipping its the best growing method I've found.

    DSC_0250 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    Basically the sponge fits into Styrofoam blocks that float on the water and stay at the same moisture.

    DSC_0777 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

  5. #13
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing RSS. You always have the most interesting growing methods!
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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