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Thread: Propagating a small Cephalotus

  1. #9
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Well I am quite sure you know more than a thing or two about plants, so I am confident they will grow well regardless of what happens. I will be interested to see how quickly the original division starts putting out mature pitchers. I think that it's not necessarily hurting the roots that can slow a plant down, but some people report even just moving the roots a little bit will cause the plant to slow down. I just potted up another Cephalotus division today - it has two mature pitchers - but I will be keeping an eye on it to see if it halts growth altogether, though I am almost positive that I didn't break a single root or jostle it too much in any way, I am expecting it to take it's time for a bit.

    My largest Cephalotus took just about 3 years to start regularly producing mature pitchers. So... we'll see.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    I'm trying to think of a plant which produces side rosettes or suckers, where if such a side growth is cut off, leaving the roots intact, it sets back the main plant. I can't think of any. If anything, the main growth is sometimes strengthened.

    Here's a closeup view of the biggest plant. Notice how the emerging pitcher at 6 o'clock has a thicker petiole and noticeably longer hairs than the older (pale) pitcher at about 8:30. (other still growing pitchers are at 2:30, 9:30, and the newest one at almost midnight). I take it those are consistent with a larger pitcher, if nothing else?


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    Decumbent Fanatic Jcal's Avatar
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    Retracted

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    It should be emphasized that what I did was more like taking cuttings. I cut off two secondary rosettes. The rootball was not divided, nor even significantly exposed to do this. It is probably best compared to other situations where cuttings are taken, and the roots are not disrupted. Certainly removing the first tiny division/cutting was more like removing a leaf than splitting a plant in two.

    I haven't seen any sign of pitcher or leaf loss (other than those I've deliberately removed). I did accidentally break off the one mature pitcher the division came with (mostly obscured in the upper right of the first photo). The 2 divisions/cuttings look unfazed as well. Does the leaf/pitcher loss set in after time? The new growth on all 3 also looks good.

    I'm guessing the plant underwent more trauma traveling several thousand miles, being repotted and grown in a new environment, than it did having two small side rosettes sliced off with a razor blade. Presumably the side rosettes would show the greatest problems, and I don't see any yet.

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    Here's another view of the newly emerging pitchers:



    The one in the middle is an existing pitcher; the others are new growth.

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    Here is a comparison of one of the existing pitchers (left) and one of the emerging, and still growing pitchers (right). The scale is not exact, but the pitchers are about the same size.


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    pmatil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dexenthes View Post
    My largest Cephalotus took just about 3 years to start regularly producing mature pitchers.
    That's a long wait. I'm waiting for my hummer's to produce adult pitchers. The person who I got it from propagated it from a leaf pulling on 9/6/2013. It is still making teeny tiny pitchers in my care.
    Looking for N. Campanulata hybrids. Also would like to grow some nepenthes from seed. Growlist/pic thread: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...-Pete-s-plants

  8. #16
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmatil View Post
    That's a long wait. I'm waiting for my hummer's to produce adult pitchers. The person who I got it from propagated it from a leaf pulling on 9/6/2013. It is still making teeny tiny pitchers in my care.
    My conditions were variable as well, so it's not as if I was the premier Cephalotus care-taker, but it certainly is a long time considering how small the plant (still) is.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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