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Thread: Cephalotus Development

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    DroseraLover's Avatar
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    Cephalotus Development

    I have a Cephalotus plant that is ~5 years of age. It is really healthy, produces at least one new pitcher every other month, and it is growing. It is still tiny though, and I know these plants are supposed to be slow to develop. How long should it take a healthy Cephalotus plant to reach its maximum size?

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    Decumbent Fanatic Jcal's Avatar
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    maximum size is a very loose term. most people consider a ceph mature once it starts making mature pitchers. others when it flowers. I have plants that are mature and flowering that are only around 4 inchs across. been that way for years. I have other plants that are touching the edges of a 14in planter.

    different clones grow at different sizes. if your plant is 5 inches and has not changed size there are a few things you can do to try to increase the plant. repot if needed and feed it.

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    corky's Avatar
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    Wise words from jcal, a picture would be good and a description of how you are growing it, for example the amount of light , temps and how you go about watering. There is also a difference in growth rate of seed grown and plants produced from cuttings
    Last edited by corky; 03-16-2015 at 01:23 PM.

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    A Cephalotus described as "tiny" after five years growth is evidence that it isn't getting ideal treatment. I think you need to describe its growing conditions in detail before we can offer suggestions for improving its rate of growth. A photo would be helpful as well.

    To give you some context: I have Cephalotus specimens that are a little more than 3 years old from seed that have filled 4" pots to overflowing with pitchers over 2" tall, so to me - your plant seems exceedingly slow to develop.

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    corky's Avatar
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    Great minds and all that

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    Here is one taken from an Emu Point leaf pull, somewhere around 3 years old. Growing on a windowsill in my house in a watering tray that has fertilizers added to it. The pot is 8" tall by 3" square at the top. Keep in mind I'm not giving them a winter rest. I would consider both of these close to there maximum size without repotting, playing with their lighting, and/or temperature changes.


    Cephalotus Emu Point by randallsimpson, on Flickr

    Another leaf pull from the same time frame, sorry can not read the label from the photo but playing match the Ceph it looks like a 'Hummer's Giant'.

    DSC_0734 by randallsimpson, on Flickr

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    DroseraLover's Avatar
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    Well, it may be younger I suppose. I received it from a nursery that stated it was 3-4 years old when I bought it. I have had it for ~7-10 months now, I forget what month I bought it last year. The plant itself has doubled in size since I bought it, but as the picture above points out, I have seen numerous photos of supposed 3 year old plants looking much larger than mine. It grows in an 8 inch pot for now, in a peat/silica sand mix. It receives about 8 hours of direct sunlight per day in the window.

    Despite its doubling in size, the largest pitchers are only two centimeters in length. The new pitchers are double the size of the adult ones on the plant from when I bought it. Otherwise, the plant seems really healthy. Perhaps I should feed it bloodworms more often. Or maybe the plant is not as old as I was told. If it was actually 3-4 years old when I bought it from this unnamed reputable nursery, that is pretty pathetic growth compared to the plant photos above.

    How often should I feed the plant? I give it one bloodworm per month right now. Should I give it one bloodworm per adult pitcher?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DroseraLover View Post
    Despite its doubling in size, the largest pitchers are only two centimeters in length. The new pitchers are double the size of the adult ones on the plant from when I bought it. Otherwise, the plant seems really healthy. Perhaps I should feed it bloodworms more often. Or maybe the plant is not as old as I was told. If it was actually 3-4 years old when I bought it from this unnamed reputable nursery, that is pretty pathetic growth compared to the plant photos above.

    How often should I feed the plant? I give it one bloodworm per month right now. Should I give it one bloodworm per adult pitcher?
    If the plant doubled in size over a year under your care I'd be happy with that growth rate. Some clones grow at slower rates than others and every time I've gotten in a new Ceph it has taken a good 1-6m for it to get used to my conditions and start growing.

    I have never actually feed pitchers so someone else would have to help out with that. I just add a low strength fert to the water.

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