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Thread: In-situ S. flava, minor, minor var. Okee and psittacina in Nassau County, FL

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    Chicxulub's Avatar
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    In-situ S. flava, minor, minor var. Okee and psittacina in Nassau County, FL

    A few shots of a few of the plants that I found in a field that was mowed last fall.

    S. flava-


    S. minor var. minor-


    S. minor var. Okee-


    S. psittacina-
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    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    So - if these were mowed last fall we can expect more pitchers this year? A nice collection of species, though I am assuming the Okeefenokee form of S. minor was introduced. Are the rest of the plants naturally occurring or is this a proving ground for Sarracenia species?
    - Mark

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    Chicxulub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemax View Post
    So - if these were mowed last fall we can expect more pitchers this year? A nice collection of species, though I am assuming the Okeefenokee form of S. minor was introduced. Are the rest of the plants naturally occurring or is this a proving ground for Sarracenia species?
    They're all naturally occurring. I'm assuming the one plant is an Okee because it is much larger than the rest of the minors and it has significantly different pitcher morphology. I live only 20 miles from the Okefenokee; it was previously discussed here that it is possible/probable that there is genetic drift. I'll freely admit that my interpretation is open to scrutiny; this may simply be an unusually large S. minor var. minor.

    Today on my rounds I also found a bunch of Drosera brevifolia and what I strongly suspect are some Utricularia subulata.

    Here's the D. brevifolia:



    The utrics weren't in flower, so I figured it wasn't worth while to try to get pics of the little thread with a bud.
    Last edited by Chicxulub; 05-11-2015 at 03:06 PM.
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    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    'Sounds like a wonderful spot. Thanks for posting it.
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    I'd be curious as to how extensive the natural range of the S. minor var. oke truly is. I have a plant in my collection, originally from St. John's County, FL (south of Jacksonville) that is very tall, with very thin pitchers that looks a lot like an oke giant. It's also very yellow (which while not directly relevant, is still cool IMHO).

    It's much farther from the swamp than Nassau.

    Thanks for sharing pics from the site! Always nice to see plants in the wild.
    Last edited by jlechtm; 05-13-2015 at 05:46 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlechtm View Post
    I'd be curious as to how extensive the natural range of the S. minor var. oke truly is. I have a plant in my collection, originally from St. John's County, FL (south of Jacksonville) that is very tall, with very thin pitchers that looks a lot like an oke giant. It's also very yellow (which while not directly relevant, is still cool IMHO).

    It's much farther from the swamp than Nassau.

    Thanks for sharing pics from the site! Always nice to see plants in the wild.
    I have some seeds stratifying from this population, collected the year it was discovered (2010): http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.230...21106811398303 They're from a friend, though I'm hoping they're not too old to sprout. This location is critical because it doesn't have the federal protection of an NWR. Not only is it an extremely rare occurrence of S. minor var. okefenokeensis outside of the swamp NWR, but it's genetically distinct. The site is incredibly interesting from a geological perspective, as you'll no doubt see in the paper preview. If anyone's able to get ahold of the entire paper, I would love a copy!!!
    Last edited by theplantman; 05-13-2015 at 07:47 AM.

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