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Thread: Pitchers curved on a dividing Sarracenia?

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    Pitchers curved on a dividing Sarracenia?

    Same one that has the caterpillar issue, starting a few weeks ago it divided into maybe four or five plants. All the pitchers it produces are small, and the ones that look like they would grow to full size are bent sort of like candy canes.
    This is a picture of it a week and a half ago, in the background you can see the candy cane pitcher. Is this normal for a dividing plant to produce? In better news, squishing the pitchers a bit fixed the caterpillar problem. I did it just to see what would happen and no further damage in two days.

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    It's nearing the end of the growing season for many Sarracenia species and hybrids. I would suspect the plant is growing the non-carnivorous leaves - phyllodia. If the "candy cane" leaf is the red edged one with the Drosera leaf across it I would definitely say it is phyllodia.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    It's nearing the end of the growing season for many Sarracenia species and hybrids. I would suspect the plant is growing the non-carnivorous leaves - phyllodia. If the "candy cane" leaf is the red edged one with the Drosera leaf across it I would definitely say it is phyllodia.
    Okay, thanks. It's putting out a mix of these and regular. This is my first year with Sarracenia, so I still have a lot to learn.

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    You'll see that. There is a transition period. You'll also see what I call "intermediate" leaves - that might have small pitcher tube that runs down part way.

    Each of the species pretty much have their own timing as to when and how long they grow phyllodia before going dormant. S. oreophila can start phyllodia development in early summer. After you've grown them for a few full growing seasons you'll start to pick up on their rhythms.

    Twisted deformed pitchers are typically indicative of a pest problem like aphids, mealybugs or scale.
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    I got a few common sarrs from a trade but I've never had luck or tge space for the long tall ones as opposed to the short rosetted ones, and they are just these non carnivorous tubes like u are describing good to know itll put normal ones out over time. Now they are like twisty little tubes of round grass.. Lol.

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