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Thread: Darlingtonia germination

  1. #9
    fredg's Avatar
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    These seedlings are from unstratified seed. The germination rate seemed to be fair.

    Fred

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  2. #10

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    Is the unstratified seed fresh seed? In my experience with non cp seeds, sometimes fresh seed will germinate immediately. If allowed to age / dry, then stratification becomes necessary.

  3. #11
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    I tired seed fresh out of the pods from my own plants in cultivation and from other growers. I've tried seeds field collected by Barry Rice and other LACPS members. I've tried seed from the ICPS seed bank and my own seed that had be stored in the refrigerator for one month to 3 years. The results were always the same - no germination (even after waiting 3 months) unless seeds were stratified. No difference either from between the "coastal" and "mountain" populations.

    Norman Deno's tests also showed no germination without stratification of Darlingtonia californica seeds. See "SECOND SUPPLEMENT TO SEED GERMINATION THEORY AND PRACTICE" page 28, available for free download from the USDA digital library. He reports no germination without stratification and 100% germination by the 3rd week after 4 weeks of stratification at 40F. Germination temperatures were kept at 70F. Seeds germinated in the dark as well as in light. Some species need light in order to germinate.

    The bottom line is stratification of Darlingtonia seeds does not harm germination and may even increase the ratio of germinating vs non-germinating seeds. All it does is take up 4 weeks of your precious time.

    Some species seeds have a dormancy period between the time they ripen and the time they will germinate. Norman Deno writes: "Every species must have some mechanism for blocking germination until the seeds are dispersed. While this is true, it was not emphasized sufficiently in the Second Edition or First Supplement that many seeds that germinate in the 0-70D pattern use an additional physical method. Examples are grains and annuals like Cosmos. Relatively short periods of a week or two of drying are sufficient to destroy the chemical systems blocking germination. The seeds remain in the recepticles (sic.) on the upright stems for weeks after that. The seeds would germinate after a rain were it not for the fact that the seeds are held open and upright so that moisture readily drains
    away and the seeds quickly dry out after a rain. They are thus prevented from germination before dispersal even though such seeds will germinate immediately if placed in moist paper towels or moist soils."
    Last edited by Not a Number; 10-04-2015 at 03:32 AM.
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  4. #12
    fredg's Avatar
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    Plenty Of UK growers get germination from fresh Darlingtonia seed without stratification. Perhaps we're just better horticulturists?
    Fred

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  5. #13
    A leuco by any other name would still be as gluttonous. CorneliusSchrute's Avatar
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    Fresh cobra plant seed always germinates well for me with no stratification. Even seed around six months of age stored dry in the refrigerator has "popped" well for me. This is with seed from various sources. Usually I see around 90 percent germination. If I had to guess, I imagine the seeds I collected from my plants this year will be about my tenth round sowing Darlingtonia.

    That said, I have never tried germinating exceptionally old seed. I have, however, stratified cobra seeds just to see if I noticed a difference. I had always heard they needed the stratification period, but it seemed to make no difference the one time I tried it: germination was still high.

    I always go with the standard 1:1 mix for seedlings, maybe with a thin layer of finely chopped sphagnum. Long stranded while moss makes reporting later a hassle.
    Last edited by CorneliusSchrute; 10-04-2015 at 05:58 PM.
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  6. #14

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    Nice. We shall see. They've been in the fridge for a few weeks now, and I think I will sow them next week.

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