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Thread: Overwintering Sarracenia Bare-root

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    I Am the Terror Of the Night! NemJones's Avatar
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    Overwintering Sarracenia Bare-root

    The dreaded season has returned, and I need to allocate the sarrs into the
    fridge before they freeze solid. However, this year im going to be fighting for space,
    so the sarrs will be bare rooted. What is the best way to do this without shocking them,
    exposing them to fungus, or letting them dry out?

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    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    Unless you're growing something like S. psittacina, you should be able to overwinter Sarrs outside in zone 5 given proper insulation. My plants freeze solid for most of the winter and regularly experience lows of 15F with no issues under 1' of pine needle mulch.

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    I Am the Terror Of the Night! NemJones's Avatar
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    MY plants are potted, only maybe 10 inches tall. 2 Flavas, A purp, and Catesbaei. Along with 6 oreo seedlings and 2 jonseii seedlings.
    Winters here are hellish. Temps easily hit -5 on a warm day.
    Last edited by NemJones; 11-14-2015 at 02:57 PM.

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    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    If you mulch heavily and sink the pots into the ground, you shouldn't have an issue except for the seedlings (which should probably be inside under artificial lights anyway) - purps and flavas are some of the most cold-hardy Sarrs. Regardless, if you still want to go the refrigerator route, I would suggest doing it how one would do VFT refrigerator dormancy. I've never found a need to keep my temperate plants anywhere besides outdoors during winter, so I can't help you much with this.

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    Gardening freak! tommyr's Avatar
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    Watch this video (I do some of mine this way):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHoC...I41wRe5SgRpIcQ
    Twitter : Tommytimbertoes


    This signature removed because of whining little crybabies.

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    Your Real Mom ErrorEN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SerMuncherIV View Post
    Unless you're growing something like S. psittacina, you should be able to overwinter Sarrs outside in zone 5 given proper insulation. My plants freeze solid for most of the winter and regularly experience lows of 15F with no issues under 1' of pine needle mulch.
    Just curious, Alvin. Where might one find pine needle mulch for sale locally? Used some sort of wheat straw as a mulch last year and it was disastrous.
    How can gravity be so strong if it doesn't even lift?
    >Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/gr...-growlist.html

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    SerMuncherIV's Avatar
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    Sorry Eric, I've never actually seen pine needle mulch for sale at any garden center, I just collect it from the neighbor's bhutan pine branches that overhang my yard - it makes up for the annoying pine cones, I suppose. The needles are large, flexible, and resist rot much better than larch or juniper. I would definitely avoid straw-based mulches, I've used them on vegetable beds before and had huge fungal outbreaks.

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    I Am the Terror Of the Night! NemJones's Avatar
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    There are articles on how to cultivate fungus gardens using straw mulch.
    I believe the acidic properties of the needles is what keeps them away

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