User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  2
Likes Likes:  4
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 16

Thread: Cephalotus Powdery Mildew

  1. #1
    Swagalotus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    324
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cephalotus Powdery Mildew

    Hey all. I have neglected my cephalotus collection a lot, and I've decided I want them to start looking good again. Sadly, almost all my plants are completely covered in powdery mildew. Does anyone a way to cure this beside neem and more air movement? I recall hearing that sulfur based fungicides work; can anyone give me a link to where I can buy some?

    Many thanks!

    Ivan

  2. #2
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sulphur is a third rate fungicide and is phytotoxic to many plants, to some degree. Get a proper fungicide. One that has Propiconazole as the active ingredient is ideal, but avoid "combo" products like the Bayer three-in-one crap. Neem is okay, but far less effective than a real fungicide.

  3. #3
    Swagalotus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    324
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    Sulphur is a third rate fungicide and is phytotoxic to many plants, to some degree. Get a proper fungicide. One that has Propiconazole as the active ingredient is ideal, but avoid "combo" products like the Bayer three-in-one crap. Neem is okay, but far less effective than a real fungicide.
    Will search up fungicides with the ingredient you mentioned, thanks!

  4. #4
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In the past, I have successfully used straight sulfur powder on Cephalotus, available at any garden center, worth its salt . . .
    Last edited by BigBella; 12-15-2015 at 02:00 PM.
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In my experience, sulfur cause less phytotoxicity when condensed onto the plants than when sprinkled or sprayed - and I literally mean condense. Buy some elemental sulfur granules or pellets, place in a metal bowl, and heat over a hot plate. If done in an enclosed space, it sublimes and condenses back on the plants, killing the PM. Be aware that this stinks and can be corrosive to metal.

    As noted before, try a real fungicide. Other actives to consider for horticultural use besides propiconazole are mycobutanil, thiophanate-methyl, and azoxystrobin. These are all systemic within the plant to some degree. Just be sure to follow the label. Things like Neem, sulfur, and chlorothanonil work best as contact fungicides and must be on the leaf surface to work.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Whimgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,875
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by stemrust View Post
    In my experience, sulfur cause less phytotoxicity when condensed onto the plants than when sprinkled or sprayed - and I literally mean condense. Buy some elemental sulfur granules or pellets, place in a metal bowl, and heat over a hot plate. If done in an enclosed space, it sublimes and condenses back on the plants, killing the PM. Be aware that this stinks and can be corrosive to metal.
    And lung tissue....

  7. #7
    Swagalotus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    324
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    And lung tissue....
    LMAO. No chance of melting sulfur in my kitchen. Parents would kill me lol.

    I'll stick with regular fungicides for now. Thank you for the replies

  8. #8
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The ancient Greeks used sulfur (fire and brimstone) fumes to fumigate or purify objects and dwellings. There are a few references in Homer's Illiad and Odyssey. A goblet in the former is purified with fire and brimstone in the former (book 16). In the latter Odysseus calls for brimstone, a brazier and medicinal herbs in order to purify the great hall after the slaughter of the parasitical suitors (book 22).

    Sulfur fumes turns into sulfuric acid in the lungs.

    That's not to say that "real" fungicides are any safer:

    Propiconazole - toxicity, ecological toxicity and regulatory information
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •