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Thread: Has anyone? and Can I?

  1. #1
    kjnorris918's Avatar
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    Has anyone? and Can I?

    Has anyone grown either of these types? I'm eyeing them at sunbelle exotics. They are beautiful.*
    -S. 'Dana's Delight'
    -S. readii #1 Alabama Red -Natural hybrid of (leucophylla x rubra)

    But the biggest question is can I grow these successfully in Las Vegas? I've read they need they're winter dormancy with temps. close to freezing. We don't get that cold here. Is there a way around this or am I better with just nepenthes?*
    Thank you.

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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    S. "Daina's Delight" (it's commonly misspelled as Dana) is a very common and easy to grow cultivar. There's probably plenty of people around here who grown some clone of S. x readii too. I can't personally advise you about growing Sarracenia in a desert climate, but I do know that people successfully grow them in Arizona. I'd be more worried about the summer heat than high winter temperatures, and you can always put plants in the fridge for dormancy if necessary.

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    kjnorris918's Avatar
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    I never thought of the fridge.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    A lot of people do grow 'Daina's Delight' (it was registered as Dana's Delight but was meant to have the other spelling due to a publication error), and I grow S. x "readei" "Alabama Red" (should be x farnhamii ssp. bellii while we're giving out details, as it's likely a rubra gulfensis hybrid), which is a very vigorous and large plant. Both are great plants to try starting out with.
    As for growing in the desert, so long as you can provide enough water and give them a decent acclimation period they should be able to grow outside well, or if you have a window that receives more than 6 hours of direct sun that would work as well. If temperatures get below 40 F on at least some decently regular basis then they could stay outdoors all winter, otherwise as people have already stated they can be placed in a fridge when they are approaching time for dormancy.
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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    I've heard the same story elsewhere, but the cultivar does not appear to be registered with the ICPS (or else it's an omission on the website.) From what I've read, the original grower has no interest in registering it.

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    kjnorris918's Avatar
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    Hcarlton thank you that's very helpful.

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    Isn't dormancy more affected by light levels rather than temperature?

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    kjnorris918's Avatar
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    Someone more experienced correct me if I'm wrong but I believe it's pretty much the temperature (the light changes come with the drop in temperature) as it slows the cycle of the plant for a period of rest to help promote new growth when not dormant.

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