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Thread: Giant Cephalotus follicularis "myth or reality"

  1. #25

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    All:

    There seems to be a constant contradiction in empirical and acquired knowledge. Regarding beneficial microorganisms growing in the soil to help new cephs grow for example is one of them.

    Many carnivorous plant growers believe that one should never plant baby plants in the same media as the parent plant. But then again, others say that one should use the parent plant's original media to grow cuttings because of the microorganisms present.

    All i can say from personal experience at this stage, is that if one wants to transfer a plant from one pot to another, never leave the root naked, because this will cause the plant to contract for some time before new growth appears. It may have to do with root physical disturbance perhaps?. Although I don't have another explanation. I have never attempted to grow cephalotus in a media where other cephalotus have previously grown. If the microorganism theory is true, then why some experience cp'er say that one should not do so.

    If one attempted to grow cephs in a media used by another ceph, according to the microorganisms theory, then this new plant should flourish wouldn't it?....

    I look forward to anybody's reply or comments

    AGustin Franco

  2. #26

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    The fertilizer that Richard has come up with is named "Blue Dawning". I do not believe it is yet commercially available. The last I knew Richard does not have an email address.

    Bob, Richard listed several other species that grow in association with the ultrafamic geology, and Darlingtonia is indeed one of them, as is Dionaea, D. binata, D. graminifolia, D. gigantea which are at least tolerant of serpentine, whereas D. capensis is quite intolerant. He also noted plants with a blue/green look seem to be responsive. Other possibilities include N. villosa, and D. hamiltonii.

    Some other hints for growing large Cephalotus is to maintain high humidity during pitcher formation. Once formed, they can actually take much lower humidity. Also recommended is misting at night during the warm months of active growth, tapering off in the cooler fall and winter months. This encourages the initiation of pitchers as the plant senses optimal conditions of high humidity, and responds with the initiation of pitchers.

    As to the advisability of growing the baby plants in the same pot as the parents, if Richard's theory is correct, then this seems a logical step. This is assuming the mycorhizae are present to begin with. If not, there can certainly be other colonization by fungi other than in this coordinated and directed symbiotic relationship. In these instances it would be prudent to begin anew with fresh media to avoid a possibly parasitic relationship. BTW, the symbiotic effect is only realized in a high cellulose (sawdust and peat) media, and the fungi may become parasitic in live sphagnum according to Richard.


    I agree that there are genetic variants predisposed to larger pitchers, but it will be difficult to assess which factor is in play: genetics or environment. I hope that Augstin's research brings to light these possible variants.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #27

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    Dear Ladies and gentlemen:

    This one is for the Hummers giant fans. plant owned by Mr. Jeff Mathesson, U.S.A. I am very grateful to him as well as many others for allowing me to publish their pictures. The article about the giant cephalotus will be published in the June edition of the N.S.W. carnivorous plant society journal. Hopefully it will be online. If not, I'll make sure it is available to everyone interested in this topic. The photo is being shown at http://www.dangerousplants.com..Since the other pictures are in my hardrive and cannot be published on the net, I would kindly ask anyone to show me how to create my own webpage. I don't know how.
    Thanks


  4. #28
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    e-mail me some of your pics and I will put them up when I have a few moments.

    sswinney@**********.com
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  5. #29

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    Woot! Confermed symbiotic fungi in a CP. (I don't need to remind you how much of an advocite of the idea I am, lol)

    Leaf size, in most plants:
    When humidity is high, or light is low, a plant can afford larger leaves because water loss is not a concern. In addition to this, larger leaves let the plant gather more light should little be avalible.

    When humidity is low or light is high, surfice area becomes a thret as more flesh = faster water loss. In such situations, smaller leaves are produced to reduce water loss because plenty of light can be obtained easly.

    In plants such as the VFT, bright light with an unending water sorce will yeild fastest growth (but not nessesarily the most robust plant)

    Because pitchers are modified leaves, it is probuble that their size is determind the same way.

    Microbs and Symbiosis:
    When such a system can be formed, plant growth will always be notably improved. While few cases have been offcially documented, it is therised by some scientists that their is at least 1 fungi symbiant conpatable with every living plant, probubly more. The most famious Microb Symbiant found is that of several extreamly rare Orchids. These Orchids have become so dependent on their fungi partners that they can not grow without them. So how did people find the fungi? A lab worker forgot to clean up and some seeds go mature plant mattle spilled on them along with some mosture. When everyone came back from the weekend, the seeds had sprouted, for the very first time in captivity!

    And for the sake of noteing it, an odd fungi moved in with my baby Capensis, all "infected" grow twice as fast as those not.
    There is no item greater in value than life, for without life value would cease to exist.
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  6. #30

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    Dear Darcie:

    If the fungi-infected drosera is growing strong and is not killed by the fungi, perhaps you should try to spread it around. I would try it on Cephs and Neps and see how it goes.


    Agustin

  7. #31
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    I might be a little hessitant to move the fungi to a different genus....it (the fungi) may not effect neps or VFT's the same way, since they have different chemistries. I'm not saying don't try it, just be careful. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
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  8. #32

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    Yah, I won't be messing with the fungi untill I have mature plants with it anyways. Thankfully, it's pritty distinctive (and I forgot, it's more bacteria like then fungi-like under the microscope). Anyhow, whatever it is, it makes a brown slime that covers the roots. And then the slime ferms up and becomes a funky network of root-like things. I think it's actually multipull organisms.

    Edit: Hey, I just thought of something, our local botanical gardens have a Ceph and it's pitures are purple and red and a good 2-3 inches in size o_O I thought that was normal, but it must be a giant.
    There is no item greater in value than life, for without life value would cease to exist.
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