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Thread: Giant Cephalotus follicularis "myth or reality"

  1. #33

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    All:

    Let's not forget one thing. The same way parasitic fungi exist, so beneficial fungi. As a matter of fact, I am using a combination of Trichoderma fungi which prevents root rot with good results. This fungi tends to devour bothrytis, rhizoctonia, fusarium and other nasties. In most cases, bad fungi never does anything beneficial to the plant. It just consumes it all and moves on to the next target. I agree, though let's be careful, but you should try it...

    Agustin Franco

  2. #34

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    Gus is spot on with this. As I have stated so often before, as a general rule, fungi are NOT your friends. BTW, Richard Davion's research also demonstrated that even the beneficial fungi can become parasitic under different conditions. Remember that integrated associative systems in habitat differ greatly from cultivation, and any appearance of fungi should be closely evaluated.
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  3. #35

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    On fungi: Yup yup, I was trying to kill it when I sudenly discoverd the infected plants were the healthy ones, lol

    On the Cephs: I just got back from the gardens. Their plant has 2 inch tall pitures [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
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  4. #36

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    How big can the pitcher of the typical gets?

    Bjørn

  5. #37

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    Typical cephalotus grows up to 5 cm or 2 inches (that is measuring from the bottom of the pitcher to the lid. However, this type of measurement is always inaccurate, because as you may already know, the lid moves up and down depending on the relative environmental humidity levels.

    Giant forms usually have pitchers that are more than 5 cm or 2 inches from the bottom of the pitcher to the peristome or mouth.

    I hope i have answered your question

    Agustin

  6. #38

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    Hi All:[P]Does everybody want to see large plants in small pots?. Please look at this one [img]http://jcps.hp.infoseek.co.jp/03173.jpg
    [/img] The picture shown above is courtesy from Mr. Naoki Tanabe (japanese carnivorous plant society). The plant shown above is the giant form introduced to Germany by Mr. Harold Weiner (1987). This clone is commercially available in Germany and Switzerland. However, prestigious cp shops in The U.S. are acquiring it to have it available to the public. Very precious indeed.[P]Notice the differences between the giant form (true giant) and the hummer's giant. The hummer's giant has a very wide ventral T rib, while the true giant's is very thin. Likewise, the hummer's giant peristome or mouth is very thick, while the that of the true giant is very thin.[P]From the pictures, i have seen of Julie's giant, it looks different from these two. It'd be wonderful to check the genetics of these three plants. [P]Enjoy.[P]Gus [P]
    --------------------

  7. #39

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    Edit:
    Viola! Just have to steal a few links, people. You're making it too hard! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

    PS I'm still not seeing any real obvious differences



    Oops, was doing an edit to make the image visible and didn't realize Tony already did it...

    Nice pic, Gus. Thanks. I must say i'm having trouble see which structures are distinctive between the two giants, though. Are you comparing the ceph in this photo with the one at the top of the page?
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  8. #40

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    Correct:

    Maybe we should try to put them side by side.

    Gus

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