User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 7 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 LastLast
Results 49 to 56 of 83

Thread: Giant Cephalotus follicularis "myth or reality"

  1. #49

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    792
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dear All:

    The owner of these pictures goes by the name of Jonathan. He has his own website: www.cephalotus.info.

    I think he's outdone himself this time. These pictures are fabulous. Giant cephs are a reality not a myth!!!. Please enjoy.

    german giant
    [img]http://home.**********.com/agustinfranco/cephgermangiant.jpg[/img]

    Hummer's giant
    [img]http://home.**********.com/agustinfranco/cephhummersgiant.jpg[/img]

  2. #50
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It looks like by the coloration of the plants that they have gotten very good light. Which leads me to believe that indeed it is the genetics and not the result of a low light situation which tends to increase plant size.

    Very impressive!

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  3. #51
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Westchester County, New York
    Posts
    5,377
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote
    It looks like by the coloration of the plants that they have gotten very good light. Which leads me to believe that indeed it is the genetics and not the result of a low light situation which tends to increase plant size.

    Very impressive!

    Tony

    [/QUOTE]
    I was thinking the same thing....Now what happens when you put Hummer's giant in a lowlight setting? Do the pitchers get even bigger? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img]
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  4. #52

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    319
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tony,

    From Jonathon's website...

    "Another factor in the production of large pitchers is light levels. In full sun, Cephalotus will pitcher and these pitchers will be well coloured, but they will be small compared to those produced in shade. The way round this is to grow them initially in shade (approx 50%) and to slowly introduce them to more light, to bring out the purple colouration."

    So this might explain how they are deep in color.

  5. #53
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm Ok so I guess the question still is are they still 'Giant' if they are grown in the same conditions as normal clones. IE will you be able to look at a batch of plants and say ok yes those there have obviously much larger pitchers than the rest all other factors being equal.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  6. #54

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Cambridge, MA, USA
    Posts
    818
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Emesis:

    He also says that he doesn't care for that coloration, so he grows his in part shade all the time.

    I have to say, thought, that that ceph is pretty colorful. I guess shade is a rather ambiguous term.

    Gus, you said there were distinguishing features between "giant" and typical besides pitcher size. Would you please explain in detail what those features are?
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
    NECPS.org - New England CP growers unite!

  7. #55

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The initial variation in size and color I noted in my own plants seems to hve evened out under my care. These plants are in Stewardship, and were grown to maturity by another grower to whom I am acting as a caretaker. I can discern not a lot of difference between my "Typical" and "Giant" forms. but the "red" clone really does seem different, producing longer and thinner pitchers with greater coloration under the same light conditions. These I can easily tell apart. As to the others, I feel that time will tell: my Giant form is a small cutting, but is producing pitchers as large as my mature plants. Will the pichers continue to get significantly larger? Or, was it just that a larger pitcher was used for the cutting? I can't say, but this season should tell me a lot. My plants are bursting into new growth now, with old pitchers browning off and rapid new growth starting..

    I do agree the way to get large colored pitchers is to grow them in lower light for size and gradually acclimate them to high light. I also feed each pitcher with pill bugs twice in the season: nutrition plays a role in pitcher size as well.

    I have yet to see the "egg sized" pitchers I have heard of, although I have some nearly 3 inches on my "typical" clone. I would love to see such!

    If I haven't mentioned it before, don't be in a hurry to remove yellowing older pitchers until they brown off as the food reserves in these pitchers will be translocated to the plant, and are of value to it.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  8. #56

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Cambridge, MA, USA
    Posts
    818
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post

    It's strange you should mention that, Tamlin. I mean, the part about your cephs bursting into new growth. I was just going to post the following two pictures before i read that:



    The first was taken four weeks ago, to demonstrate how slowly my plant has grown (especially in pitcher size) since i got it a year ago. In the last week, it has suddenly sent out three or four MUCH bigger pitchers (still small compared to your 3" monsters, though). The strangest thing about that is that it's under growlights, and has been for quite some time, so i wouldn't expect it to be on the same cycle as yours.

    If i was a superstitious person, i would attribute the magical spurt of growth to the bit of soil i begged off of a certain successful Ceph grower as innoculant, in case there really is anything to the rumored fungal mutualism. I realize that the conditions my plant endures would not promote any beneficial interaction with mycorhyzae (sp?) as currently understood, but it does make me wonder a bit.

    Then again, it could be just a coincidence that the plant finally decided to do something with itself.
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
    NECPS.org - New England CP growers unite!

  9. Page 7 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 LastLast

    Similar Threads

    1. Meet "Medusa," my 20-year old Czech Giant Cephalotus follicularis
      By Listserv.org in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
      Replies: 28
      Last Post: 01-01-2011, 05:17 PM
    2. Cephalotus follicularis "Typical" - Maneatingmoo $28
      By BigBella in forum 2009 NASC Benefit Auction
      Replies: 8
      Last Post: 05-03-2009, 09:03 AM
    3. Cephalotus cv. "Hummer's Giant" -- Leaf-cutting . . .RSS $60
      By BigBella in forum 2009 NASC Benefit Auction
      Replies: 19
      Last Post: 05-02-2009, 04:50 PM
    4. Cephalotus "Hummer's Giant" -- Get The Kids Started On One Today! RSS $75
      By BigBella in forum 2009 NASC Benefit Auction
      Replies: 17
      Last Post: 04-30-2009, 07:46 PM
    5. Baby Cephalotus "Hummer's Giant" for trade. Pics!
      By Clint in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 11-04-2007, 02:40 PM

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •