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Thread: Giant Cephalotus follicularis "myth or reality"

  1. #57

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    I don't discount the mycorhizal hypothesis, just caution that there are fungi and then there are not so fun guys. I have all my plants under growlights as well, but you know, I believe the plants see right through the growlights into the heart of the Magic Sun. This is the time to grow and go...in the last week, plants that sat there doing nothing except not die have all burst into growth.

    In my mini bog, as well as in the 200 acre bog I frequent I notice a very fine white fungal network glistening in the morning dew. In the mini bog it is not always visable, but whenever it appears I notice a distinct increase in growth rate of all the plants in there, esp. Dionaea. I too used a bit of this as an innoculant in my pots. Now, it could be coincidental: both the plants growth and the presence of this fungi might be related to ideal cultural seasonal conditions, and have nothing to do with each other. I did place a single rosette of the pygmy Drosera species D. nitidula ssp alantostigma in the bog, and was amazed to see the size it reached: larger than a 50 cent piece, and how else to account for the disparity in size? It's obviously getting something the other rosettes in peat/sand aren't getting, and it's not from increased prey capture. I am going to place a cutting of my own little Cephalotus that I have been growing for over a year in there to see if it speeds the maturing of it, as I speculate it will. I'll keep you posted as to my results.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #58
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    Dmuscipula, My typical plant showed a similar burst of energy this spring. This year it is growing pitchers three to four times the size of the old pitchers. Is this just because this spring may have been more favorable for ceph growth? It was cooler than usual I guess.

    Cole [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
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  3. #59

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    Dear all:

    I would like to say that i love to discuss these matters for months or years to come until we get a definite answer. We can't comprehend anything in absolute terms. If you remember that, then you'll be fine.

    The main differences between the german giant and the hummer's giant is the T-ventral rib (the hummer's giant has a wider rib than the german, as well as the peristome (the peristome in the hummer's giant is thicker. I have also noticed that the average size of the hummer's giant is 10% larger than the german, but I guess, one will be closer to the truth, if we were to measure the average size of all the pitchers between the two types and then, make a comparison. I guess Jonathan is in a very good position to do this.

    William: I have the large egg size pictures, but I am still waiting for my local cp society to publish the article on the net and I promised Julie Jones not to post it until the whole thing was published or posted somewhere. I was wondering if someone here can make room for the article on this website. I'll be more than happy to post it here, of course, if i am allowed to do so.

    For the mycorrhyzal theories. i do believe they play a part in it, but as some of you may know, I am actually growing several cephalotus clones, and believe me, to have a large pitcher size cephalotus "typical" is very difficult. I am wondering if William's so called typical are in fact typical cephalotus. Nowadays, one must be careful with terminology. Julie Jones from the U.K. grows all her cephs under the same exact conditions, but then again, she says that there is only one giant ceph plant in her collection which still produces giant pitchers (genetics over environmental). Furthermore, when she got her giant ceph, she did not know it was in fact a giant form.

    Therefore, it is very possible that one of William's typical cephalotus plants is a giant form and not typical. If it happened to Julie, it could have happened to William.

    Agustin Franco

  4. #60

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    Agustin,
    I would say the average Hummers pitcher is bigger than the average German pitcher. While the average typical form pitcher in my collection for a mature plant is about 2 - 2.25 inches.
    I am also growing a cutting from Julie Jones's plant - its about a year old and has a couple of pitchers around 3/4 inch, so, it's looking quite good.
    I'd be very interested to see your article on giant Cephs when it is ready.

    Jonathan
    Cephalotus follicularis

  5. #61

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    Hi all:

    I would like to welcome Jonathan to the forums. I hope that we all can learn more from him and hopefully he can also learn some things from us!!.

    Regarding pitcher size, it would be helpful if from now on, we measure from the bottom of the pitcher to the peristome (or mouth). Why?, because as you may all know that the lid moves up and down depending on the relative humidity. Therefore, a pitcher with an average size of 2-2.25 inches by the old method, in fact, it should measure 1.75-1.8 inches in reality.

    The next target should be to compare the Julie Jones's clone with both the german and the hummer's giant!!. How??.
    Well, genetic analysis would be the way to go.

    Gus

  6. #62

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    Gus,

    You may indeed be right, I could have the giant form and not know it. I certainly defer to your greater experience in this, I just have not grown enough plants of either form to know :-)

    I greatly look forward to the published results of your research. If you have permission to reprint the article, please consider doing so in Pete Thiel's Online CP Ezine.
    This is just the sort of thing that would be perfect for it.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  7. #63

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    All:

    I would like to announce that the article titled :

    Cephalotus follicularis giant forms is available online at:

    http://www.humboldt.edu/~rrz700....nt.html

    I would like to thank Mr. Robert R. Ziemer for his assistance in publishing this article. Without his help, it may have taken a lot longer to make this wish come true.

    Gus

  8. #64

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    Thanks Gus. Is there any work being done right now to investigate polyploidy in giant cephs?

    One suggestion i have is that you replace "quicksilver" with mercury, as that is by far the most commonly understood term (at least here in the states). It amazes me that mercury vapor lamps achieve such good results considering the poor spectrum of said lamps. It wasn't clear from the article how much the Hg lamps are supplemented by natural lighting. Could you please explain a bit more? I have my cephs under artificial lighting, and would like to optimize the conditions as much as possible.

    I have to say that i still don't see the difference in the ventral T you mention, at least from the photos in the article. It would be really nice to have a labeled photos of a Hummer's giant and true giant, with the differences marked for those of us too inept to see it ourselves. However, the increased "teeth" size on the peristome is very evident, even to me. Interesting.
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

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