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Thread: Cultivar status?

  1. #1

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    I would like to ask the groups' opinion as to what qualifies a sarracenia for cultivar status. I understand it needs to be a plant of particular note and be exceptional but, what point system or criterial is used to judge it? I also understand that in needs to be stable in cultivation and it is desirable if it can be reproduced in tissue culture. Your thoughs on the matter?

    Obsessed
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

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    Hi Brooks,
    You can contact the ICPS about registering a plant for cultivar status. They have some guidelines..
    Best Regards

    Mike King

    NCCPG National collection holder of Sarracenia

    http://www.carnivorousplants.uk.com

  3. #3
    Guest
    For Sarracenia, and all other carnivorous plants for that matter, there is no point system or judging criteria. I know it sounds vague but, a plant simply needs to be unique from the typical to warrant being a cultivar. To give a cultivar relevance, the plant should be distributed. As for propagating the cultivar through tissue culture, it isn't necessary. Usually, cultivars must be propagated asexually to maintain their "uniqueness". However, there are some cases whereby, the cultivar can be propagated sexually.
    As Mike King recommends, read the information on the ICPS website.

    imduff

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Following is the link mentioned in this thread:

    ICPS Cultivar Registration
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    I just talked to Barry about cultivars and he said that if I felt the plant in question was unique and I wanted to apply for cultivar status then that was what I should do. So it seems that it is all up to the grower [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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    Thanks Guys,
    And Pyro, thanks too. I wanted to hear what yall thought. I know there are guide lines within ICPS. I have heard comments about sarrs that a particular sarr. did not deserve cultivar status. What would yall( sarracenia growers) think was exceptional? What would you like to see developed?

    Brooks
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  7. #7
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    I really don't think that anyone can judge whether a plant deserves cultivar status. It really comes down to taste. What is the cliche? Tastes are like butts, everybody has one.
    Perhaps there should be some kind of judging criteria but, how could you make it fair?
    If you think about the hybrids that Adrian Slack made over twenty years ago, you might find them "dull," compared to some of the newer hybrids. Yet, they all deserve equal credit as cultivars.
    I enjoy Sarracenia hybridizing. When I think about making crosses, I usually consider a hybrid that I like. Then I think about making improvements/changes to the hybrid. That's just the way that I consider my crosses.
    As you already know, a cultivar doesn't have to be a hybrid. There are several cultivars that are species.
    imduff

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    Imduff,
    Exactly! This is the sort of lively debate I want to here from other sarracenia growers! What do YOU personally feel is good? The early hybrids were important yes. They are the early parents of some of the more spectacular hybrids and have set the ground work for the hybrids we have today.I agree, this is a matter of personal taste. We all think we have the prettiest baby. I would love to hear what some of yall are working on (Hybrids) and what you hope to achieve. I have found several natural crosses that I think are worthy of cultivar status but how can I, a neophyte, upstart think that I can just waltz in a present these as 'CULTIVARS' and think that I will not be stepping on someones toes?
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

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