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Thread: Do Sars need dormancy?

  1. #9

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    The plant is in excellant condition. So you manually clean of any fungus? It would be difficult to do that if it got on the roots, though. Is their any point to hibernation at this stage?

  2. #10

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    I recently received the interesting information below about dormancy from Tristan's Carnivorous Plants nursery, which is located in a tropical climate on the island of Hawaii (the "Big Island") in the state of Hawaii (USA). I don't think they would mind me using the information here.

    "We live near sea level on the east side of the Big Island. Nearly all the Sarracenia do fine and go into dormancy from photoperiod on their own. They are going into it now. They will come out again in January and February and repeat their cycles. For the most part, I have seen no effect on S. flava, S. alata, S. leucophylla. In fact, it seems they all do quite well. I will say that perhaps S. purpurea will not quite attain as large of pitchers here in Hawaii as they would in cold climate with good long dormancy period, but otherwise, most seem to do just fine, which surprised me after moving here and sending many of our plants here. We had a nursery in Oregon before, so we were used to cold long dormancy periods, but we have been growing the same Sarracenias for over five years here and they seem to be doing fine."

    I believe that "photoperiod" refers to the number of daylight hours. On the shortest winter day there are 11 hours from sunrise to sunset, and on the longest summer day there are 13 hours of daylight. The temperature differential between winter and summer is not great. I'm guessing that in summer the highest temperature during the day is 85 degrees F., and the lowest temperature during the night is 70 degrees F. In winter, the highest day temperature is 80 degrees F., and the lowest night temperature is 60 degrees F.

    So for most Sarracenia, it appears that reducing the photoperiod is more important than reducing the temperature for dormancy. I'm new to CPs, so I'd be interested to read the comments of those who have more knowledge and experience than I on this subject.

  3. #11

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    Please see my comments on this topic in the wrigleyana thread. no doubt photoperiod has a lot to do with it. Here in south Florida, our Sarracenia come out of dormancy at the end of Feb. like clockwork. It's because the days are getting longer and its the dry season, so they get lots of sun. Also, we experience some of our coldest weather. It doesn't phase them in the least. The real trick is getting them to go into dormancy in December. Right now we have some alatas that are sending up flushes of great looking traps with the onset of cool weather. I wish they would slow down! This could be a potential problem if they don't stop.

    Trent

  4. #12
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    What might happen to a sarracenia, lets say a leuco, that keeps sending traps up in November, and then in a week's time, is hit with freezing temperatures? I am wondering if the cold snap we saw up in the Northwest last month might have had detrimental results to a couple of my leuco's that were still sending up traps right before the cold weather hit.

  5. #13

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    What Brisco described happens to them in nature. In spring, those late season cold fronts can bring freezing temperature not only to new traps, but to flowers. The traps may or may not be affected-they just send up more, but the buds will blast meaning fewer flowers.
    I would let the leuco traps take the damage and hope for some phyllodia as a result of the cold snap.

    Trent

  6. #14

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    What is the correct photoperiod then? Could I put them in a dark box and use tungstun lamps on a timer to set it off? Would I still need to use fungicide?

  7. #15

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    Like what Nick said, fungicide is a preventative. There's two kinds of fungicides (to simplify matters): topical-which treats the exterior of the plant, killing potential pathogenic fungi, and systemic-a fungicide absorbed by the plant's tissues, making it poisonous to fungi. You should be careful with systemics, because an overdose can be harmful to the plant. I use a systemic called Cleary's 3336 (I think that's how its spelled?), or a similar formulation called Fungo 50. If you use too strong of a dose, you will get deformed pitchers, so stick to the recommended dosage.
    As for photoperiod: I believe you're in the Pacific NW? I personally have no experience with growing Sarrs that far north. However, if people winter them in the fridge for two months-that's a lot of darkness. I wouldn't worry about dormancy photoperiod. A grower in Montreal once told me he has no problem with Sarrs, even when they are frozen solid, they always come back. Maybe some of you west coast folks can make suggestions here.

    Trent
    in sunny, subtropical Boca Raton Florida

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