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Thread: S. Oreophila - Inefficient?

  1. #1

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    Noticed something in Nick Romanowski's Gardening with Carnivores that seemed interesting - he says that "In the wild, [S. oreophila] is said to be the most inefficient insect catcher of all the southern species."

    Thought this was a little confusing... Is oreophila inefficient in cultivation as well? I don't grow any myself, so what's everyone else's experience? If it is, any ideas why? It would seem strange if a plant so close to S. flava would somehow be less attractive to insects, but who knows?

    As a possible follow-up, what species or hybrids do you find to be most attractive to insects? I've heard leucophylla or flava, but it should be interesting to hear other people's experience.

    Mike
    Mike

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    I don't pay too close attention, but it at least in my collection, leuco and hybrids with leuco in them seem to catch the most insects, or at least fill up the fastest. I can't recall ever seeing my oreophilas getting many bugs in them. I'll pay closer attention this year.

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    Hi Mike. I always thought that S. purpurea and some hybrids of it were the most inefficient. I've only ever seen a few bugs in my purpurea. In my experience, S. leucophyllas and S. 'Judith Hindle' always fill up first. I'll be able to tell you about S. oreo. later this season since I just received my first one.


    -buckeye

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    thats a lie! (that they dont catch much food) [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/mad.gif[/img] my oreophylla pitchers were filled to the top this winter, with earwigs! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] unfortunately when i cut one of the pitchers off, it was very heavy with earwigs, and i dropped it... at least 50 live un digested earwigs came out! they must have been living on other, dead, earwigs. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/ghostface.gif[/img]

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    brisco225's Avatar
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    Off the top of my head, I believe Schnell states that they should be kept further away from other plants, because of the competition for insects.

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    Huh. My experience show that leucos and x 'Judith Hindle' are really attractive to bugs, flava a little less so, alata and minor caught some (but they were smaller, so they may impact the data) and pupurea just a dud. I will have my first summer with a few more types this year. Those are the only ones I've grown outside to see any comparrison.
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    Theres a few reasons why this may be true , most of S. oreophila color is green , not very attracting to bugs that like red things such as a vft's trap or a flower , also , S. oreophila may not contain as much of the aroma that attracts insects as other plants , i don't knwo for sure yet but i'm just making a hypothesis and also the plant is endangered and not many people study it too much so there maybe a little misconception here . Otherwise , that quote may have a lil typo in it .

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    Interesting to hear everyone's opinions..... have to agree that the Judith Hindle is apparently pretty attractive, even the pitcher or two that opened in December are filled.

    Actually, the color was something I hadn't really considered. I believe someone theorized a while back that leucos fill up so fast because the tall white tops just look a lot like flowers to flying insects, so it would seem to follow that greener species might be somewhat less attractive.

    Given the difference in experience from people like Spectabilis, though, maybe the statement that oreos are "inefficient" is simply inaccurate.

    Lovely story about the earwigs, by the way, heheh....

    Mike
    Mike

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