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Thread: S. oreophila

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Hey all, regarding the recent CPN issue and the article on S. oreophila composed by Michael, the one photo of the oreophila plants really matches my form for the description of "heavily veined". Anywho I thought I would capture the early buds because they happened to catch my eye....


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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Here we go:

    The typical looking flower of S. oreophila...



    Of course it hints an pecularities to come.....



    The pitchers coming up


    Any comments? I'd appreaciate some word of wisdom from anyone like sarracenia, Mike King, or Sarraceniaobsessed since those people have a great deal of expierence and can indeed confirm the identity of this plant.

    (If's there's any Sarracenia guru I forgot to mention, my apologies! )

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    Arrow

    Oooooo Aaaaaahhh

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    S. oreophila, heavily veined form is best recognized when the pitcher fully opens and is standing in direct sun for a week or so. This will give the color a real chance to shine through. Oreo's can be anywhere from veinless, to a rare all maroon plant. And all points in between. The oreo "Don Schnell", Peter D'Amatos cultivar, is about as heavily veined as I have ever seen, and not in cultivation at this time. The maroon form was found by yours truly on the Little River in Alabama in a, at that time, unknown stand. They have since been put under F&WS protection. I doubt that these will ever be in cultivation, but I think that the rare color is still locked in their genes, and is just a matter of time before someone out there comes up with another one from another plant that is in cultivation. Show us a picture of a pitcher after it has been in the sun for a week, and an absolutely positive ID can then be made. Also, oreophila's can grow in much dryer situations than most other pitcher plants, but do best in damp to wet soil.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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    I think I'd just call it S. oreophila heavily veined.

    It's a nice looking plant but where has the hood gone on the largest pitcher
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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    Maybe Alvin. But for sure, let the pitcher develop. And Alvin is right, what happened to the large pitcher?
    45 yrs. growin\'
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    Nice, dustin! You shied me away from taking pics of my oreophylla... not quite as big and magnificent as yours

    Maybe the top of the pitcher broke off while it was say, a centimeter tall? it would have sealed up, but still kept growing

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Thanks for information guys!


    Um the pitcher was...hehe nicked by clumsy me. ;p Oh well, it still will be big just a little goofy looking. There are some other pitchers the same size or larger so its not that big of a loss.

    Oh, BTW my phyllodia on the plant looked like a "C" , extremely curved and Mike King assured me when I showed a photo of the phyllodia it must be S. oreophila, but not sure what form it is yet.

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