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Thread: Wet overwintering of plants

  1. #1

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    This was not a controlled experiment, but I feel I have to say something about the way my plants spent the winter. I keep them in the unheated basement where temps occasionally reach freezing, but are typically in the high 30s (F). I have in the past been careful to follow the stated advice to keep them just moist over the winter months. Due to a shoddy job by a contactor, my back porch drips water into the cellar, and the spot I had the plants stored for the winter (in childrens wading pools) became filled to overflowing despite my best efforts to keep them drained. We had a very busy winter here, and I just couldn't keep up with it. I checked the plants, whose pots were *completely* submerged, but the plants seemed ok, so I didn't fret about it.

    In other years I have lost several plants per winter to a fungus that attacks the rhizome. I have come to expect it. This year, I had not a single loss. The plants responded immediately when growing conditions became appropriate, and are pitchering as never before. They grew faster and woke quicker. The rhizone divisions I placed in small pots since they were just starts have nearly filled the pots already, necessitating division already! At this rate I will need to repot twice a year! I think some growth and rooting must have happened over the winter to get such a response, and I do attribute it to spending the winter as aquatics. They are a full month ahead of where they were last season.

    Athough it may be just a fluke chance, I plan on repreating this protocol next winter, and though I would pass it on for your consideration. One thing is certain in light of this, and that is the advice regarding wetness levels for particular species is probably *very* subject to ammending to suit your own conditions, and probably a generalization based more on ill luck than certain fact. Better to drown them that to let them dry off.

    It is quite a spring here for me thanks to the 30 or so clones I got last July (my eternal thanks!). They did not pitcher for me last season as they came late, but this spring I am seeing many new sights, and I am being blown away daily by the beauty and variation of these plants!!!!

    Sarracenia are destined to replace all my other plant loves! When I can no longer afford to maintain the indoor collection, these wonderful plants will still be with me. I am really getting a feel for growing these plants!

    So be forewarned.....pitcher plant growers are going to be hearing my wimpers of need this season. I'll be knocking on your door hat in hand, you know me! If I get too out of line, just beat me off with a stick.

    Ok, gotta go stare at them again, it's been over two hours.....

    Addendum: Oh, yeah, I almost forgot to add that the Dionaea and D. filiformis also spent the winter nearly as aquatics. It appears that fungus can't grow underwater, and the plants themselves are well adapted to taking this in stride.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #2

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    Some plants, the only one I know of is S.pssittaccina, like to spend their winter ENTIRELY submerged. In the wild, these plants often catch tedpoles when submerged.
    Carnivorous plants growlist:http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....t=17597
    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

  3. #3

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    Yes, that has been long reported and always was good advice. I wonder why no one has applied this to other members of the genus?
    "Grow More, Share More"

  4. #4
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Water submersion. Sounds like a P-man thing!

  5. #5
    IceDragon's Avatar
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    Well, I keep my plants out in the open all season long rain or shine. In general they are flooded/frozen all winter long, until spring when the the water is evaporated.

  6. #6

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    I had the same problem. i stored my vfts and sarrs on my back porch this past winter here in philadelphia winter temps average 50 at the highest and the lowest was 0 but that was just once usually never below 15. so temps were up and down. they were all doing good until about march when the temps would thaw the frozen pots for a couple days and then freeze again. with the damp spring i lost them to fungus and i mean all my sarras and all my vfts. S.purpurea, minor, flava , leuco, and oreophila(which is still hanging on but the fugus atacked the growing tip and it doesnt seem to doing good. I sprayed them when i noticed but it was to late. So i need to find a soulution to this problem because . i lost all my temperate plants during the spring. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/mad.gif[/img]
    ~Brandon~ aka ~Carnivorkid~
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