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Thread: S. oreophila dormancy

  1. #1

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    Hi -

    I know that S. oreophila goes dormant fairly early, even when kept in the same conditions as other Sarracenia, but is now a normal time?

    I expected the plant to go dormant in August, but mine's pitchers have begun to turn yellow/brown/orange and spotted, and it has many green phyllodia emerging from the base. Is this typical for July?

    Also - does this species release seed early in correspondance with its dormancy, or at the same time as other Sarracenia?

    Thanks.

    - Patrick
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  2. #2

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    Yep, it's about now that they turn coppery and start to grow phyllodia and pyllodiform pitchers. I think seeds are ripe at the same time as other species, no earlier.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
    Plant gallery
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  3. #3

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    Patrick,
    Mine are starting to go down now as well. A few new pitchers are coming up but most have turned brown or fallen over.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  4. #4

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    It makes me feel even better to hear that yours have fallen over. I left it out of my post by mistake, but of seven pitchers one of my oreos put on this year, only 3 are still standing.

    That raises another question - when pitchers on your plants fall over, what do you do with them? Prop them up, cut them off, leave them alone, or what? I have just been leaving mine be, but it looks really messy.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  5. #5

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    Yep, mine too is dying back and putting out phyllodia. I looked in the Savage Garden and read that they do this because in their natural habitat it usually gets drier in midsummer and this carries over into cultivation. So are the plants done pitchering until next spring or will they send out more pitchers in early fall?? This is my first year i've had a oreophila.


    -buckeye

  6. #6

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    Post

    I was having a discussion with Bugweed about this very thing. I live not far from oreo country and in the mountains of North Georgia summer is not the dry season. In fact, that area of the country is considered a temperate rainforest with over 72" of rain a year having daily afternoon thundershowers like FL. Also, the habitats that oreos would be growing in would be fed by springs and even in dry weather they don't go dry. I am not sure what adapation this behavior plays. Perhaps eons ago the weather patterns were different and the plants have not evolved beyond this behavior.

    I just leave the pitchers when they fall over or tie them up. I never remove them until they brown out. My feel is they are still feeding and photosynthesizing so long as they are green.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  7. #7

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    I'm glad to hear other people questioning the dryness adaptation of S. oreophila. I've though the same thing before about north Georgia - it simply doesn't dry out during the summer, except in years when we have drought which is NOT typical.

    Does anyone know about the weather of northern Alabama? That's the area that Don Schnell says has the weather patterns to trigger early dormancy. Of course, that doesn't explain why Georgia oreos do dormant, too...you'd expect local varieties as there are with some other species.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  8. #8

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    Thought I'd post a picture of my very sad looking oreophila. Sad, because it's one of the best in April and May. Dirt is from heavy rains that constantly splash peat and topple pitchers - I assume because I don't have dense enough ground coverage.



    - Patrick
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

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