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Thread: Flava photos

  1. #25

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    Beautiful plant. Thanks for sharing the great photo.

  2. #26

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    Yes it is very nice Lim.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (imduff @ Aug. 28 2004,8:41)]Here's a pot of ratty NC flavas sending up late season flowers.
    imduff

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/imduff/greenflava.jpg[/img]
    Imduff,

    This was the other plant I asked you about in the photo thread. Is it also antho-free?

    Great looking plant. I'm also still crazy about the very first photo in the thread of the Florida ornata - it's a beauty!

    Great plants.

  4. #28

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    Imduff,
    It is interesting your photo of late season flava pitchers and PDX's query as to whether or not they are anthro-free. I have a similar pot of flava regulli that are sending up late season pitchers that are showing very little throat markings as compared to what they had this spring. This seems to be typical and I also agree with your statements about about the variuos forms of flava. I don't think they are as cut and dries as Schnell says in his book. An ICPS article on flavas and the various forms and intergrades would be very interesting.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  5. #29
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    Schnell did a nice job with his classifications but, calling them varieties might not be the right choice. As we've both seen in the field, hybrids are very common. Further, intragrades leading to 'rubricorpia' and 'atropurpurea' can be seen in Florida and North Carolina, respectively. I've also done some crosses between the varieties through the years. I feel that Schnell's taxanomic classifications are not true genetic classifications. A recent discussion about the authenticity of 'ornata' might be accurate. Conversely, there could be true 'ornata' but, 'rubricorpia' might be an extremely heavily veined 'ornata.' Either way, the plants are nice to grow and enjoy.
    imduff

  6. #30

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    Couldn't agree with you more. I did enjoy kicking around that Florida "ornata" idea. It was enlightening, and fun. More food for thought!! Killer plants too, Imduff. Very nice! I am now intent on learning to use my digital camera, and showing some of mine.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  7. #31
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    Here's a moth eaten specimen growing on the Carolina coast. It's hard to judge what it is or how it fits in the flava taxonomy. It looks like it could be classified somewhere along the gradient of a veined flava.
    imduff

    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/imduff/ncflava.jpg[/img]

  8. #32

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    Nice colouration. Could be rubricorpora/atropurpurea x ornata or even a red variety crossed with anything since it seems you can still get very red plants from a cross like atro x maxima.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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