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Thread: S. flava 'red tube'

  1. #33
    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    I have seedlings from a pure red tube stand which vary in colouration from rugelii, through ornata to red tube, with a continuous spectrum inbetween!
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

  2. #34
    Guest
    Here's another image relevant to Garden's comments. Incidently, 99% of the flavas at this site are rugelii.
    imduff
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/imduff/redflava.jpg[/img]

  3. #35
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    Back to the light intensity issue for a moment . . .

    The reduced light intensity at high latitudes happens because sunlight arrives at a lower angle, not because the light has to travel further. Any difference in distance from the sun is insignificant in comparison to the earth's distance from the sun. But light arriving at a low angle, as it does at high latitude, passes through more atmosphere and is projected across a larger area of ground. Leading to much less light intensity on the ground. Weather differences matter a lot too. A fogbound coastal area receives much less sun than sunnier land further inland.

    and now, back to the substance of the thread . . .
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  4. #36

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    Fantastic pictures Mike,Tony,and limduff!
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  5. #37

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    I did visit my friend yesterday and checked out his sarracenais and in particular the flavas I gave him back in June. Well, here is the scoop: Heat effects both coloration and growth rate GREATLY! His 'Judith Hindles' were so red there was no variation in the pitchers except for the newly opening ones. The flavas I gave him had autros in the mix and at just 6" tall had highly colored pitchers. Sorry I did not take any pics. (long story) Here is how he grows his: the beds are constantly being flushed with water 24/7 by means of a complex system. (this man is an engineer) The plants are barely in an 1/2" of water. He pots up in pure peat and yes the green house does reach upwards of 130 and the plants sit on the floor. The seedling flavas I gave him were twice the size of mine from the same batch and the same age. DANG!
    I am sending my sarra seedlings to summer camp at his place.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  6. #38

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    Brooks,
    Could the superior quality of your friends plants be due to a cooler root temperature than those of us who grow them in pots...especially black plastic pots?

    Trent

  7. #39

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    Trent,
    To the contrary, Jim grows his plants in 4" black plastic pots, in trays, on concrete. Jim thinks the residual heat from the concrete released over night has something to do with it. It would be interesting to measure the temp inside the pots and see.
    I remain a man obsessed with a genus
    Brooks

  8. #40

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    According to Rob Saciloto of Botanique, heat is a primary factor in the coloration of the plants, whether in the air around them, and in the soil temps. Cooler rhizome usually means lighter colors, but since these experiments are ongoing, I will let him finish before we have another theory to kick around. I know when my plants get to the hottest time of the season, their colors are intense. And the red/blacks get their best colors, whether alata or flava.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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