User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: S. flava etoliation and s. leucophylla dormancy

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Posts
    260
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey -

    Here's a question - why, after growing a set of huge, gorgeous pitchers in the spring would an S. flava suddenly send up a batch of etoliated pitchers? Water has been constant and from the same source...

    Also -

    Has anyone else a leucophylla still not very "awake"? Mine has produced a handful of etoliated pitchers, but no great pitchers yet - same bog as the early wonderful flava. Full sun, ample water, no root disturbance since last August.

    Thanks.

    - Patrick
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  2. #2
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    they aren't etoliated, it's getting late in the summer and plants are starting to make weird pitchers with giant ala's. it's like they are still trying to decide weather or not to make phylodia or pitchers. mine are doing the same thing. also, if you've had strong rains like we've had lately, it can push/pin the pitchers down and make them grow really strangely.

    leuco's send up another batch of pitchers around fall.

  3. #3
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The early pitchers are always the best on my flavas. I had intended to cotton ball most of the lava pitchers this year to see if that would encourage it to grow better pitchers through the summer. But I never quite got around to doing it.

    My Sarras grow on top of the fence along the dogs' yard and they feast heavily on flys and yellow jackets drawn to the area. I've wondered if the abundant nutrient supply encourages the plant to quit trapping and to instead focus on photosynthesizing.

    Unlike flavas, a leucophylla's Fall pitchers are the best of the season. They'll be taller, much wider, and with more striking coloration. I know it's happening every year, but I'm always surprised by those pitchers.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    3,556
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    JLAP nailed it. Same here, Patrick. The pitchers don't know if they want to be phyllodia, or pitchers. Don't worry about it. Sometimes it'll happen for several years, then a crop of pitchers will last into the fall and be quite stunning. Let them do their thing, they'll be back with a vengeance in the spring.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,005
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your plants are acting completely normally. Flavas do their thing in spring and then grow phyllodia and phyllodiform pitchers.

    Leucophylla grows pretty skinny pitchers until September, when it starts getting going.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
    Plant gallery
    Grow list

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Athens, GA
    Posts
    260
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks everyone -

    I knew that flava would switch over to phyllodia, I just wasn't aware of the phyllodiform pitchers. Very sadly, nearly all of the nice pitchers were destroyed two weeks ago in an incredible rain we had. Oh well, there's always next year.

    As far as the leucophyllas go, I'm not talking skinny pitchers. That's what my leuco Tarnoks have been doing. But one of my normal leucos is producing huge alas with a 2 cm red and white hoods on the ends...I guess I'll just wait and see.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •