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Thread: Allaire state park in new jersey

  1. #9
    HellzDungeon's Avatar
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    if its illegal to colect wild plant material, then how do people collect wild nep seeds?
    do you need a permit or something?
    Hellz
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  2. #10

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    im sure you can obtain a permit for collecting. unless perhaps the plant is endangered

  3. #11
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    i've collected alot of wild plants and other rare stuff like orchids for trade, however it was on my own property and i have myself permission and nothing was endangered. also, i only took a small, small fraction of what was there.

    i've never collected any cp's , i have however gone on bog raids and rescued sarrs what were going to be destroyed from delevopment "with permission"

  4. #12
    IceDragon's Avatar
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    Hmm, how about collecting cps like U. inflata, who naturalized in Washington. From what I heard is becoming a pest up there.

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    Collecting seed can be very helpful to the local plant population. A S. purpurea's seeds get distributed over a very small area, so if you collect a seed pod and distribute half of the seed around the bog and keep half, you've helped that plant's reproductive chances, even though you've left with some seed.

    When I lived in Maine, I'd take a ripe Trillium seed pod if I came upon a few during a day in the field. I would leave seeds here and there as I did my thing. I never kept any, but just did a Johnny Trilliumseed act. I think Trilliums ordinarily rely on ants, not geologists, to scatter seeds. It isn't a perfect method, but ants do carry them undergound.
    Bruce in CT

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  6. #14

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    Hellz -

    We're talking about the United States, specifically in parks. There aren't many international plant laws (CITES being an obvious exception).
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  7. #15

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    Ice Dragon,

    Unless it's in a protected park, I would imagine it's open season on invasive Utrics, lol.

    Joe

  8. #16

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    but does anyone know of where to go to find specific laws? i have tried the parks website and i believe the dep's site and nothing came up about carnivorous plants. i would do the spread seed thing but if its like carolina with 50,000 dollar fines i don't wanna touch the seed. i believe s.purpurea is also the only pitcher in new jersey too.

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