User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 24

Thread: Soil exhaustion?

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    2,974
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Jim,

    What do you mean exactly by impurities. Going over my head on that one for some reaso.... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img]
    Based on Tamlin's TDS meter, there seem to be a lot more impurites that I would have thought. I nuke my peat in the microwave, but I have never soaked it. I thought it might leach out the tannins, but maybe only very hot water does that.
    The peat tea adds tannic acid, which lowers the pH of the soil, and brings out that red coloration in some plants, most notably Sarracenia. I imagine using that and having them really close to the lights would help red dragon flytraps too.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I never thought much about it, but I do believe peat tea may include undesirable salts dissolved out of the peat. BTW, it was not just my TDS meter, the readings were confirmed by two other researchers as well. I haven't experimented with its use, but other have commented favorably on its use.

    It may be that Sarracenia are not as sensitive as Drosera to accumulated salts. I rather think this is the case, although I have noted the decline of plants I have received that used what I feel is "questionable" sand prior to their repotting.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #11
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I repotted several 1+ yr S. leucophyllas in mid summer and, a few weeks later, unpotted them to send them to someone. During that short time, they had an enormous amount of root growth. But I use a mix of LFS and volcanic rock (the large, irregular perlite stuff), a combination I think encourages better root development.

    Sarracenias don't really go dormant, so I prefer disturbing them when in full growth. That way they have an active metabolism to heal injuries and fight infections. Maybe they're dormant in a refrigerator, but mine are clearly active in the winter, even with air temperatures sometimes below 0F and and a pile of oak leaves overhead. They aren't doing much, but they're doing something.

    Peat breaks down when aerobic and most roots need aerobic conditions. For that reason, muck farmers need to balance the drainage needed for crops against the increased decomposition of their soil resulting from the aerobic conditions. Decomposing peat in a pot can lose its nice structure and become an amorphous goo that restricts the passage of water and air. That isn't good for Sarrs.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting that you say they continue to grow. I was amazed to find that the plants which were supposedly dormant in the winter (as aquatics!) seemed so much larger the following spring. I have no other option but to believe the rhizomes continued to spread, and it may be due to the aquatic overwintering. Something did happen though because in the spring the plants grew and flowered like never before.
    Your comments on the muck are spot on: nasty things happen where there is no oxygen to discourage anaerobic processes. If I had access to volcanic rock, this would be my choice as well to provide aeration. I do not like perlite. I think liberal use of LFS also helps keep things clean, aerated and happy, and I use this in all my mixes.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #13
    herenorthere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    almost Hartford
    Posts
    3,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since I have far fewer plants, a 2 cu ft (I think) bag of volcanic rock has lasted a while. I thought I ordered it from Jim's Orchid Supplies in Florida, but now I'm not sure. I checked his website and he calls his sponge rock and I think his is a smaller size. So I'm at a complete loss as to where I got it.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  6. #14
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (The Griffin @ Sep. 08 2004,11:39)]Jim,

    What do you mean exactly by impurities. Going over my head on that one for some reaso.... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img]
    Based on Tamlin's TDS meter, there seem to be a lot more impurites that I would have thought. I nuke my peat in the microwave, but I have never soaked it. I thought it might leach out the tannins, but maybe only very hot water does that.
    The peat tea adds tannic acid, which lowers the pH of the soil, and brings out that red coloration in some plants, most notably Sarracenia. I imagine using that and having them really close to the lights would help red dragon flytraps too.

    Cheers,

    Joe
    When I buy peat, and I use the Canadian peat, I have been strongly urged to rinse it thoroughly before using it. Nuking it has also been suggested. My question was on the premise that the peat used for peat tea was not washed beforehand. I'm just not clear as to the entire process. When washing peat, the liquid from that process is discarded of its impurities. The way I took the peat tea process is that what would have normally been discarded is now desirable - the peat tea. That's what motivated my question and my confusion. I would have done a PM, but I thought maybe I wasn't the only one with the question. Could you clarify the process for me - and possibly others? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #15
    drosera guy
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Düsseldorf, Germany
    Posts
    310
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tamlin Dawnstar @ Sep. 07 2004,5:20)]I buy one mega bale of peat per season, and that seems to do the trick.
    William I do not want to offend you, but did you think about the gigantic bogs that are destroyed for producing peat ?
    I always try to use as little peat as possible and keep it for as long as possible. Use good water without salts and try to mix your peat with as much perlite, sand and so on as possible.
    Peat is a natural ressource which needs much time to be produced ...

    Jan

  8. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ouch Jan.

    It is true, peat is not a renewable resource. I do not use it in any context other than CP growing (soil additives, gardening, etc).

    In this case, the peat reserves in Canada are extensive and in no danger of immediate depletion. Without peat, what I do would not be possible! I think I do a good work.

    So for now, I figure the good that comes from my use of itoutweighs the negatve impact. Sure, I could boycott it and find alternatives, but it wont stop the many millions of gardeners who really are not aware of the issues, or don't care about it, even if they are aware.

    I can use it and still sleep at night, so I will continue to do so.
    "Grow More, Share More"

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •