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Thread: Soil exhaustion?

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    I have a s. alata that is fairly 'old'. I'd say about 8-10 years old. It's soil is composed of straight peat. I got it this way from a nursery earlier this year. I decided to divide it earlier this year and did so with a fair amount of sucess after debating the whole thing for some time. I put the divided plant in a mix of about 50/50 peat and sand. It is at my neighbors house for he loves these things but wants an easy plant to care for. That plant is doing exceptional, and the others that were left in the all peat mix are just kinda blah. Now I know that stress is a factor here and yeah, the plant at my neighbors house gets about 45 mins more sun, but could this be a case of soil exhaustion? same plant and the only real difference that I would connect would be the soil composition. I do not know if this plant has ever been repotted except for what I did. I am curious to know what everyone thinks. I will be repotting here soon. thanks...

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    Repotting CP is like restarting the computer: if there are unseen problems, such can resolve them. Over time, even with the best cultivation, salts can and do accumulate in the mix, especially if the pots are not exposed to frequent rains which leech them out. It is for this reason that I generally repot my droserae each season, if possible. The same is likely true for Sarracenia: repotting seldom hurts, and often gives the plants a boost.
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    Tamlin, you must indirectly be Cananda's leading importer of peat, lol. BTW, thanks for the 'coccicaulis' seed.
    It sounds like the others need to be repotted also, but you might wait until late Winter/early Spring so it will be less stressful while they are dormant.
    One way to keep the soil exciting is by using peat tea. This involves boiling peat(tea bags can also be used) in purified water to get a high tannic solution to water the plants with. Of course, make sure it's cooled before watering... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    I never did understand that bit about repotting only when dormant. I repot my plants whenever I or they seem to feel the need, and it has never made any difference with any plant I have ever done it to.

    You are welcome for the seed [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] I find this to be a real gem of a Drosera and I hope you will enjoy it, and pass it on. This form leans heavily towards D. natalensis I think. Other venusta's reflect more D. dielsiana, and I hope to offer seed of this type in the near future as well.

    I buy one mega bale of peat per season, and that seems to do the trick. I make them show me the goods before I buy the bale too. If I get those Brazilian seeds like I hope, I will probably need 2 bales as I plan on doubling my current 40 shop lights. Better buy stock in peat companies in Canada, hahaha!
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Joe, Elgecko and I were just discussing the peat tea, yesterday. Is there a problem with impurities?

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    I never really put much stock in repotting only when dormant. yes, I have had some plants stress when potted, but the difference in the three plants in this group is astonishing...besides repotting when dormant, when would you repot a temperate species...just an interesting point...

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    I mean a tropical species, oops...

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    Well, hmmmm. I guess I have to say I repot if the plant is behaving atypically. It could be for a number of reasons, but there IS a reason. If a plant is not prospering like it once was, there is a reason. If you can't see it on the plant, then it is probably below the surface i.e. in the roots, or in the mix. There are many ills that can affect plants: too high a salt content in the mix, the wrong Ph, root mealy bug, scale, root nematodes, anaerobic bacteria, parasitic fungi.....but they are most of them associated with the growing medium. Getting rid of IT gets rid of most of THEM, along with any undesirable salts. It affords a chance to see the roots, and to look closely for signs of root mealy: the great dreaded miserable pests that really call for chemical warfare. (This is another reason why I dislike perlite: it obscures the cottony masses that can indicate mealy bug infection).
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