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Thread: Tropical sarracenia o.o

  1. #9

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    Even if a pitcher plant doesn't REQUIRE as much dormancy, it won't hurt to give it. As long as conditions are kept a bit drier, leucos (seemingly the most touchy) can stay dormant for a long time.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  2. #10

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    Hmmmm, not so sure about the bit drier part. My Sarracenia overwintered with their pot rims underwater the whole winter, all true species and hybrids alike, and grew like mad the following spring in record time. I think many of the generalized information is just that: too general. There is always room to push the limits as to what is and is not possible.

    Whenever I try to keep the plants more dry, I always slip up, forget and lose a couple over the winter. Last winter, there were 0 losses. I'd like to see more experiments in this direction based on my success. It's a heck of a lot easire not having to monitor the moisture level constantly, and there is no danger of accidental drying off, and rewetting which is sure to rot the rhizome. Also mold can't establish underwater. Something to consider.

    My friend in Brazil grows Sarracenia without true dormancy, year after year. They slow in growth in the short days of winter and produce smaller leaves or phyllodia but return to full typical growth as the day length increases.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #11

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    I wouldnt reccomend the drying out. Just dont let the pots sit in water too long cause fungus might grow. If you water with water with fungicide in it, it should be fine

  4. #12

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    I wasn't suggesting drying the plants out. I may have given the wrong impression...

    I simply meant that you didn't need to keep them religiously wet. I see how my wording (inaccurate) was confusing.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

  5. #13

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    We have successfully grown Sarracenia here in south Florida, a sub-tropical climate, for many years. We let them dry out. Not bone dry, mind you, but if they are maintained too wet they will not take a dormancy. Overall, the more northern species are the trickiest for us-alabamensis and oreophila. Leucos are easier than flavas. For us down here, flava is prone to rot/fungus problems in late summer. Fungicide is a necessity. Also, the dormancy seems to be induced by a combination of factors-the days getting shorter combined with dryer conditions and the occasional cold front with temps down into the forties F.

    Trent

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