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Thread: S. oreophila soil...

  1. #1

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    I came across a web article that mentions S. oreophila is found in clay and mineral soils.

    I have added a small amount of clay(several handfulls) to peat and 4 to 5 handfulls of vermiculite.

    I also added several handfulls of Premium Orchid Mix to the soil. It is bark and charcol. I busted the charcol into smaller pieces with a hammer. Some fine dust is generated in the process. It goes in the mix as well. Hopefully, the bark will add drainage to the mix.

    If you take several quarts of dry peat from a bale and add it to a bucket of water and squezze the water into it, the peat seperates into two types. This may take several hours to settle.

    The layer that settles on the bottom is very fine and is dark brown. The layer that floats is a light brown color and more coarse in particle size.

    The top layer drains very well. The bottom layer tends to become too compacted when used alone. When the soil dries, it tends to seperate from the pot. Different mixes may give results needed for a particular plant.

    I am eager to use more clay and clay types, but am proceeding with caution as clay holds a great deal of water. I am adding the small amount stated now in hopes to enrich the minerals in the soil, as with the vermiculite.

    I am searching for a better soil recipe for S. oreophila than is stated for the basic soil mix in CP books. I think modeling cultivation practices that more closely follow Nature should improve their survivalbility and growth rates.

    Especially, since there is rumor that the next ICPS Sarracenia Distribution may include S. oreophila.

    I welcome any comments, ideas, or criticism.

    Tweek
    \"The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.\" - EInstein

  2. #2

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    I think the source of the clay is what's important. Its natural habitat probably has a very specific type - you don't want anything loamy or packed with iron.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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    Alvin,

    Why is that, just out of curiousity? Is that lethal for Sarracenia. I only ask, as that kind of soil seems to work for petiolaris sundews and other Aussies. N. merriliana seemed to like laterite when added to the soil, when I grew that.

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    Well loamy clay would indicate a mixture with normal, nutrient rich soil. Red clay packed with iron would also probably burn the roots of sarracenia.
    I could be wrong, but I suspect there is more to oreophila's natural soil then a mixture of any old clay, sand and peat.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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  5. #5
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    One thing I would be worried about with the clay additive is the possibility of mottling....may be unheathly for the roots even if the minerals didn't harm it.

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    It isn't surprising S. oreophilas are found on clay because the upland wetlands they live in need something to act as a liner. But many plants of unusual habitats grow there because they aren't competitive elsewhere, yet are able to tolerate the unusual habitat better than other plants. It doesn't mean they necessarily prefer the unusual conditions.

    On the other hand, maybe you're on to something. I potted an S. oreophila with my S. alabamenis 003 in my standard Sarracenia mix of LFS & sponge rock. The S. alabamensis has grown to an enormous size and the S. oreophila is little larger than at the start of the year.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  7. #7

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    S. alata (and other species) are found in clay along the gulf coast, as well. I think they tolerate it, but they would grow better in a lighter mix.
    Newnan (Atlanta), GA
    - what do you do when your bog is full? you build another. and another. and another. then you buy some pots. and some more. and some more. and some more. then you wonder how much it would cost to rework the hydrology in your yard to place your house on an island. -

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