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Thread: Dormancy help

  1. #9

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    Dan,
    Your S. leuco 'Tarnok' possibly took a dormancy, like what Bugweed said. Spring would be a good time to make the transition to the outdoor growing space with your other Sarrs.
    Scot is right, get it out of the terrarium.
    As for where Sarrs grow in Florida, they don't grow south of Lake Okeechobee. The outside temperatures where we are located are more mild than Dan's terrarium! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    Brrr, cold house.

  2. #10

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    Bugweed,
    Where are you located in California? Interesting note about the South American growers.
    Have you noticed any problems with S. flava? We can't seem to prevent rhizome rot in mid/late summer here in South Florida. We suspect there may be fungus or bacteria here in our sub-tropical climate which do not live in the Fl panhandle where the soil may freeze during winter. We use systemic fungicide in the summer, but the fungicide isn't 100 percent, even when we switch types. Have you heard of similar problems with other warm climate growers? The problem is almost exclusively with S. flava and S. alata to a lesser degree.

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    Hi, Trent. I am in Martinez, California (The San Fran Area) where sarrs grow big and PHAT!!!!! LOL! The weather here is perfect for outdoor growing of sarracenia. Late summer does bring us 101 to 108 degree heat, and has a tendency to dry out the hoods on the sarrs. Jim Miller (Tallahassee) lived in Sacramento for a few years where it is real dry. He used a cold water ionizer (I think) outdoors among his atropurp's, and they went nuts! I plan on trying that this summer too. As far as the root rot problem, that is usually a warm soil problem with minimal oxygen being drawn into the soil. One way one friend dealt with it was by allowing a warm water drip to drop on the pot (same temp as the soil) and allowing it to thouroughly drip straight through the pot and out the bottom. As it did this, oxygen was permeating the soil, being drawn down by the water drip. His root rot fungus, went away. Worth a shot. Trays for watering are ok, but a real bog with water constantly permeating the soil and running through and out (YAY!! Drainage!!) is the best. I am writing an article on building a working bog for the Carnivorous Plant Newsleter for the ICPS. (Barry Rice asked me to). I have a small bog garden that has had the same plants in it for 15 years, without a soil change. Water constantly running through the bog, drips through the bottom and into the base container. The dripping water adds oxygen to the water and recirculates it. Anyone out there that got a "Schnell's Ghost", or a "Marston Dwarf" from me, you now know where they are growing! The running water bog! Try that , Trent, and see if it helps alleviate soil fungus problems. Heck, maybe I should get the pieces and parts, and write that for the Forums. And take pictures. I don't know if anyone's interested though.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  4. #12
    cool85k5's Avatar
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    Hi Bugweed,I an very interested in your bog.If you don't post it here could you send me a diagram of how it is setup?


    Jerry

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    Bugweed,
    Thanks for the input. We don't use trays, infact, we grow things on the dry side. This seems to help prevent most rhizome/root rot, but those S. flavas are prone to it anyway - for us. Never thought of using more water to prevent rot, but MOVING water and aeration make sense. Thanks!

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    Oh, by the way, we would also like to see pictures of your bog garden.

  7. #15

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    Glad too! This spring I will attempt my first pics on this forum. I have never posted my plants pics before, and it will be a first for me.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  8. #16
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    Exclamation

    Hello! I have a Sarracenia leucophylla "Tarnok" and other Sarracenia plants. Now, here is the tthing, I live in Puerto Rico, in the middle of the Caribbean Sea, and all my Sarracenias have gone into dormancy naturally. I have them in my saran green-house that has only a top and no walls, so they are exposed to the weather. And what I think have made their dormancy a success is that I removed the water-tray, and though I water them everyday, the water is not kept in the pot because of the drainage holes. So maybe, like some of you have said less water makes them get dormant.

    But another thing that has happned is that since the sun-light hours are less and the sun is inclined in the horizon in winter, this has helped them in their dormancy. To be specific, the place where I have my Sarracenias is against the nothern wall of my house, so this causes that the southern winter direct sun-light is none, during late fall and winter.

    Summing up, I think that less water and less sun-light will make Sarracenias go into dormancy.

    Now, since sun-light is increasing they are breaking their dormancy, so I will give them again their water trays.

    Dan, I think your “Tarnok” have already gene into dormancy, with “full sun for about six hours and the temps range from 55 at night to around 85 in the day” that I think is enough to encourage dormancy, since I have here about 5 to 6 hours of indirect sun-light and temperatures in 50’s F by night and 70’s F by day, and mines have gone dormant. So you should be preparing to make an artificial spring in your terrarium. And then place it outdoors.

    Trent, you say that there in Florida seems to be a fungus or bacteria that causes rot on the rhizomes of Sarracenias, do you have this problem very often? I have never had that problem with mines.

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