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Thread: Sarracenia pics

  1. #9

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    I have heard the oroephila "rumor" about dryness too. So, I fill its undrained container to the top with water, and keep it good and soaked. Water to the top! All winter too. The oreo in this bowl is 17 years old, and none the worse for wear.
    Rot can happen to any plant at anytime, and wetness may not be the contributing factor. I don't want to test this factor though. Jim Miller (of Hanrahan & Miller) has seen oreo's in Alabama growing where the soil was almost bone dry, and they were gorgeous, and others growing on a stream bank, totally soaked. Both stands were healthy and strong. I wouldn't ever thumbs down the dryness method, but I also use, as I have told you, an always wet method too. So far with no ill effects. The winter here kept the water good and cold, and now I have 5 flowers coming up in the bowl. Wolf, the appearance of your rhizomes is typical, so don't worry. Make use of whatever method works for you, and keep asking questions.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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  2. #10

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    We plant the rhizomes exposed on top, so we can keep a watchful eye on them. In our sub-tropical conditions we find it best to allow the rhizomes to dry out a bit, to help prevent possible rot problems.
    We don't have oreophila, so have no practical experience with it, but I've heard some of the old timers talk about how dry they get in mid-summer, and often they go into a mid-summer dormancy when drought conditions occur. If you've been to central Alabama in mid summer, you know how hot it can get.
    Bugweed? Any other Sarr growers want to comment?

  3. #11

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    I think oreos do require wetness early on in the season in order to hold on to their new pitchers, and at this time in Alabama it is wet after winter and spring rains.

    What time of year were the soils bone dry? During summer the old pitchers are lost because of the dryness, and this even happens if kept soaking.

    I keep my oreophilas wet as I do all my others, and they lose their pitchers in July. I find that keeping them wet though you can gain a small second crop in summer, albeit just a couple more pitchers.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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  4. #12

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    You are lucky on that second crop. Mine just quit, and go to sleep.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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  5. #13
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    I grow my 3 pots of oreophila the same as the rest of my sarracenia. They are planted in the six inch deep pots, and the water level is about 2 inches below the rhizomes. I have had no problems with rot.

  6. #14

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    While the degree of wetness may or may not be the primary factor in root rot, I think it is definitely the secondary cause of the problem.

    The primary cause is a range of plant pathnogens from the fungus kingdom. Mainly Fusarium species. Others are: Pythium and Rhizoctonia species.

    Source: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/crops/02938.html

    The site lists a table that illustrates the initial conditions that will lead to root rot by several fungal pathnogens.

    They are: soil moisture, soil temperature, soil compaction, organic matter, fertility, herbicide, rotation(beans), other crops, plant density, seed quality/age, cultivation and irrigation runoff.

    This site is for plants other than Sarracenia, but the same principles should apply.

    This site does mention a dry fungal pathnogen, but if the wet species can be delimited, then half the battle is won. Maybe more than half the battle, because there is no Sarracenia that is grown in complete absence of water.

    I tend to believe that the wild oreophila can be found in "bone dry" conditions. Anyone familiar with the summer droughts that are common to the region can attest to this fact.

    I would also, believe that the conditions in the wild, while appearing to be completely dry would offer some water via undergound water table. The water table depth is not static - it would vary from location to location.

    It would be interesting to see some research into the oreophila locations and the comparitive depths of the water table where they are located and the oreophila root lengths.

    Barry Rice has mentioned that there might be an oreophila plant distribution in the future. I think we need to know more about the growing conditions of these plants to ensure their survival in the wild and in cultivation.

    It is just sad to think we may never learn all of oreophila's secrets before it can never be found in Nature any more.

    Tweek
    \"The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.\" - EInstein

  7. #15

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    I do think wetness is a secondary cause. Somewhat stagnant water, poorly aereated soil, and voila! Root rot! Water should be absolutely fresh, and the soil very loose. So oxygen can work itself into the soil. You may still get root rot, but your chances are considerably less.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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  8. #16

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    I appreciate all the help. I think maybe I might try putting a 'V' in the middle of the Sarracenia oreophila rhizome and see what happens. It is hard to tell from the picture but the rhizome is quite large, so most of it is comprised of the hard brown part in the middle with no growth coming from it. When the grower that sent it to me said that it he was sending an S. oreophila rhizome as a gift I wasnt expecting one that weighed close to 3 lbs!
    You don't need an iron chest if you have a sharp brain and a silk tongue.


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