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Thread: Sarracenia pics

  1. #17

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    To be honest with you, I would just leave the oreophila rhizome alone. Let things develop as they will. The rhizome may suprise you by growing points from many other places on the rhizome, without the cut.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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  2. #18

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    Will do, thanks for the advice Bugweed. Also, does allowing the flower stalks to develop set back the production of pitchers? It appears the S. oreophila rhizome in the picture has 6 flower stalks at the moment.
    You don't need an iron chest if you have a sharp brain and a silk tongue.


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  3. #19

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    Let that baby flower. Pollinate it, and let the seed develop in the seed cap. Then, pass those babies around for all to grow. The seed alone will help take the strain off the oreo stands as plants are starting to become available. We have to help to alleviate the strain of poaching in these places. Passing out seed is one great way to do it.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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  4. #20

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    No prob will do. I should have a large amount of seed then sometime in Nov.
    You don't need an iron chest if you have a sharp brain and a silk tongue.


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  5. #21

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    What is the seed situation with oreophila? Are you allowed to send it throughout the USA as a gift? I've got a few nice oreophilas flowering soon and was thinking of sending the seeds to the USA later on, since it's so hard for a lot of people to get hold of them.



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  6. #22

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    Alvin, you cannot send oreo seed here without all the proper permits, including CITES permits. Otherwise, your seed would be welcomed. Especially the colorful forms.
    Forgot to address, Trent. Trent, it is amazing how hot and dry the Sand Mountain plateau can get in mid summer. AND as dry as it can get in the soil. Oreo's are well adapted to a clime that would kill other sarracenia.



    45 yrs. growin\'
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  7. #23

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    I think oreo is a CITES listed plant, which I think includes seed. The only way they could be sent would be to file the proper paperwork, or send plantlets in vitro. Correct me if I'm wrong, somebody.
    As for the fungus problem: what causes a Sarr to crash in our conditions appears more to be a rot that attacks the rhizome, especially the older tissue away from the growing point. The disease insidiously moves forward towards the growing tips. Keeping a watchful eye on the rhizomes, especially in late summer down here (hurricane season), and frequent treatment with Cleary's 3336 or Fungo is the best remedy. We've saved plants by pulling them from the pot, even in late summer, removing the infected part of the rhizome, sealing the rhizome cut with powdered Captan and repotting with the rhizome only half buried in fresh mix. It really is good practice to keep the plants clean around the rhizome, removing dead pitcher "stumps" and debris.
    Those of you living in temperate climates probably don't need to be so meticulous, but those of us living south (in the northern hemisphere) of Sarracenia habitats have got to watch out for these problems.
    As for seed. It readily germinates for us down here after spending six weeks on wet peat in the refrigerator. Wish we could get the Nepenthes to respond like the Sarracenia!

  8. #24
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    S. oreophila seed can not be shipped internationally as it is a CITES I listed plant. CITES I covers ALL plant parts including seeds. CITES II listed plants however do not include seed. So you can ship seed from other Sarracenia listed as CITES II without any CITES documents. Phytosanitary certificates however may still be necessary.

    There are some addendums to the CITES though.
    1. Plants in sterile culture of CITES II, and III, and HYBRIDS with a CITES I may be shipped without CITES documents. (phytosanitary and any other restrictions would still apply)
    2. Artificially propagated plants of CITES I listed plants are considered CITES II.

    I imagine however it would take quite a bit of proof by the grower to show they are artificially propagated before your government would issue such a CITES certificate. Large commercial nurseries with a history of growing from seed and TC can get these. Which is why you see N. rajah etc available worldwide.

    Tony
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