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Thread: S. alata 'areolata'

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    How many areoles is S. alata 'areolata' supposed to have? Mine seems to have the hood looking like S. leucophylla but it is obviously S. alata (and the flower also S. alata).

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    The hybrid S.x areolata? This cross can have virtually any coloration all the way from red veins with no white, to virtually all white. I have a version which is very white, alata shaped but with a frilly margin to the hoods and yellow flowers. Another cross I have looks like a veined alata but with a ruffled leuco style hood. Genetics can be strange!



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    No the cultivar S. alata 'areolata' which is the form of alata from the western range that has areoles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Treaqum @ May 09 2005,3:08)]No the cultivar S. alata 'areolata' which is the form of alata from the western range that has areoles.
    I can find no registered cultivar by that name. I doubt that the name "areolata" would be acceptable as a cultivar name because it has already been used. The ICPS Database shows:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]N: [Sarracenia areolata {Macf.}]
    P: Bail., Std.Cycl.Hort.6:3081 (1917)
    LT: Theodore, Mobile Co., Ala., US, 1909, Macfarlane s.n. (CNC) {Bell}
    LTP: J.E.Mitch.Sci.Soc.68:70 (1952)
    S: =[[Sarracenia leucophylla {Raf.}] * [Sarracenia alata {(Wood) Wood}]]
    L: US (Ala., Miss.)
    LFR: 30: Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain

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    hmm. Well it is the S. alata (type) mentioned in D.E. Schnell's 2nd edition on P. 192 and 195. From Angelica County Texas.

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    That would be s. alata "areolated form". Easier to see in Jasper County, Texas. There is an entire stand of them, and they are very cool looking s. alata. They have a very fat bulge in the upper pitcher.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]S. alata “areolata” – within the Texas and Louisiana populations of S. alata rare individuals possess faint windows similar to those found in S. alabamensis. Although the windows are not the same as in S. leucophylla they may reflect an evolutionary trend within the genus Sarracenia to develop light patches for insect captures. Read more about this in our article “What is the identity of the West Gulf Coast Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia alata Wood?” Plants are available starting June 2003.
    Hybridization often occurs between S. alata, S. psittacina and S.Ieucophylla in Alabama and Mississippi where the pitcher plant species ranges overlap. One of the results of this overlap in range is introgressed S. alata with areoles. Whether any of these areolate plants are pure genetic forms and not introgressed hybrids must await further analysis. Introgression, however, appears unlikely to be a factor in the presence of areoles in the Texas and western Louisiana range of S.alata since McDaniel (1966) noted that particular components found in introgressed S.alata were not found in areas where hybridization is improbable. Hybridization between S.alata and any other sarracenia is highly improbable in Texas and western Louisiana since no other pitcher plant now naturally grows in these areas. Thus it appears the presence of areoles in Texas and western Louisiana plants is an inherent feature of the species and not the result of recent introgression with areolate species of sarracenia. Ancient introgression between S.alata and areolate sarracenia cannot be eliminated as a factor in present-day S. alata without chemical, paleobotanical and phytogeographic evidence.

    It should be emphasized that the occurrence of areoles in plants of Texas and western Louisiana S. alata stations is a feature which may be enhanced by environmental conditions. Burning of a S.alata bog in Beauregard Parish in 1989 demonstrated this point. A site for S.alata in Beauregard Parish, Louisiana was visited in both June of 1988 and 1989. Although areolate pitchers were sought in 1988, none were seen. Many pitchers were damaged by an Exyra larvae infestation which could have obscured the presence of windows. Areoles were observed in great numbers of plants in June 1989 several months after a fire. Apparently the improved growing conditions provided by fire and suppression of Exyra larvae aided the production of areoles. It should be noted that this bog in Beauregard Parish, Louisiana possess a large, naturally open area. This area in June of 1988 was not noted to contain any obvious areolate plants but did contain them in 1989. The effect of fire, even on an open area, may have been enough to produce areoles. Conceivably the suppression of Exyra larvae by fire played a role in reducing insect damage to pitchers and enhancing areole production.

    Pipeline hillside seepage bogs in Jasper County, Texas also illustrate environmental conditions enhancing areole production. Areoles were observed in a Jasper County, Texas pipeline hillside seepage bog in both 1988 and 1989. The site is maintained in a very open condition by annual mowing of the pipeline right-of-way. These annual mowing provide open habitat and allow dense stands of S. alata to develop. Fire would naturally maintain the hillside seepage bog in an open condition, but in this instance the pipeline has substituted as a disturbance factor. Mechanical clearing by bushhogs simulates the effect of fire by inhibiting the growth of woody plants. The suppression of woody plants allows herbaceous types to flourish. Thus, disturbance of hillside seepage bogs may enhance areole production in S. alata by providing open growing conditions.
    Directly from meadowview's site.

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    Yes, yes. Now back to the original question: does anyone have any photos?

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